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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - lose in David Copperfield
1  You doen't know what it is to lose your child.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. THE BEGINNING OF A LONG JOURNEY
2  If there had been more money to lose, it wouldn't have been all, I dare say.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. DEPRESSION
3  If you was to go without seeing my little elephant, you'd lose the best of sights.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. THE BEGINNING OF A LONGER JOURNEY
4  'And by that sort of thing we very often lose a little mint of money,' said Mr. Omer.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. I HAVE A MEMORABLE BIRTHDAY
5  I expressed my sense of this commendation, and said I was very sorry we were going to lose one another.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. LIKING LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT NO BETTER, I ...
6  Occasionally, I went to London; to lose myself in the swarm of life there, or to consult with Traddles on some business point.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. I AM SHOWN TWO INTERESTING PENITENTS
7  To see her lay the flowers against her little dimpled chin, was to lose all presence of mind and power of language in a feeble ecstasy.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
8  He acquiescing, we followed at a distance: never losing sight of her, but never caring to come very near, as she frequently looked about.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46. INTELLIGENCE
9  Of Dora's being ready, and of Miss Lavinia's hovering about her, loth to lose the pretty toy that has given her so much pleasant occupation.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43. ANOTHER RETROSPECT
10  I fell into a dull slumber before the fire, without losing my consciousness, either of the uproar out of doors, or of the place in which I was.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 55. TEMPEST
11  I did not know how it was, but though there were only two of us, we were at once always cramped for room, and yet had always room enough to lose everything in.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 44. OUR HOUSEKEEPING
12  I could not have borne to lose the smallest portion of her sisterly affection; yet, in that betrayal, I should have set a constraint between us hitherto unknown.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 58. ABSENCE
13  Whether it was because we had sat there so long, or because Steerforth was resolved not to lose the advantage he had gained, I do not know; but we did not remain in the dining-room more than five minutes after her departure.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29. I VISIT STEERFORTH AT HIS HOME, AGAIN
14  I now approach a period of my life, which I can never lose the remembrance of, while I remember anything: and the recollection of which has often, without my invocation, come before me like a ghost, and haunted happier times.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. I BECOME NEGLECTED, AND AM PROVIDED FOR
15  I sat looking at Peggotty for some time, in a reverie on this supposititious case: whether, if she were employed to lose me like the boy in the fairy tale, I should be able to track my way home again by the buttons she would shed.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE
16  It is not merely, my pet,' said I, 'that we lose money and comfort, and even temper sometimes, by not learning to be more careful; but that we incur the serious responsibility of spoiling everyone who comes into our service, or has any dealings with us.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. DOMESTIC
17  I was not so vexed at losing Agnes as I might have been, since it gave me an opportunity of making myself known to Traddles on the stairs, who greeted me with great fervour; while Uriah writhed with such obtrusive satisfaction and self-abasement, that I could gladly have pitched him over the banisters.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25. GOOD AND BAD ANGELS
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