LOSE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - lose in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  If I did, I would lose all my pleasure.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
2  Philanthropic people lose all sense of humanity.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
3  Taking some one else's admirer when one loses one's own.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
4  Men and women at such moments lose the freedom of their will.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
5  Yours seem to lose all sense of honour, of goodness, of purity.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
6  It is rather late, and, as you have to dress, you had better lose no time.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
7  But he must be very good, and not lose his temper, or spend his money foolishly.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
8  I know, now, that when one loses one's good looks, whatever they may be, one loses everything.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
9  Lord Henry's casual questioning had made him lose his nerve for the moment, and he wanted his nerve still.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
10  The hair would lose its brightness, the mouth would gape or droop, would be foolish or gross, as the mouths of old men are.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
11  I don't know what I expected, but I went out and wandered eastward, soon losing my way in a labyrinth of grimy streets and black grassless squares.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
12  My dear Dorian," answered Lord Henry, taking a cigarette from his case and producing a gold-latten matchbox, "the only way a woman can ever reform a man is by boring him so completely that he loses all possible interest in life.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
13  I only knew that I had seen perfection face to face, and that the world had become wonderful to my eyes--too wonderful, perhaps, for in such mad worships there is peril, the peril of losing them, no less than the peril of keeping them.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9