LOVE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - love in Great Expectations
1  I bred her and educated her, to be loved.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
2  If now considered in the light of a liberty, excuse it for the love of poor old days.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
3  I'll tell you," said she, in the same hurried passionate whisper, "what real love is.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
4  When you say you love me, I know what you mean, as a form of words; but nothing more.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
5  It's something to have seen the object of one's love and duty for even so short a time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
6  Estella," said I, turning to her now, and trying to command my trembling voice, "you know I love you.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
7  So I kissed his hand, and lay quiet, while he proceeded to indite a note to Biddy, with my love in it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVII
8  Chokings and nervous jerkings, however, are nothing new to me when I think with anxiety of those I love.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
9  The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
10  The unqualified truth is, that when I loved Estella with the love of a man, I loved her simply because I found her irresistible.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
11  Your guardian was not at that time in Miss Havisham's counsels, and she was too haughty and too much in love to be advised by any one.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
12  Do what he would, and love me though he did, the light left his face ever and again, and a film came over the placid look at the white ceiling.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVI
13  I thought I saw him leer in an ugly way at me while the decanters were going round, but as there was no love lost between us, that might easily be.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
14  Miss Havisham gives you to him, as the greatest slight and injury that could be done to the many far better men who admire you, and to the few who truly love you.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
15  I believe she had not shown much susceptibility up to that time; but all the susceptibility she possessed certainly came out then, and she passionately loved him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
16  Once for all; I loved her none the less because I knew it, and it had no more influence in restraining me than if I had devoutly believed her to be human perfection.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
17  Dear Joe, I hope you will have children to love, and that some little fellow will sit in this chimney-corner of a winter night, who may remind you of another little fellow gone out of it for ever.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVIII
18  To the present moment, I believe it to have been referable to some pure fire of generosity and disinterestedness in my love for her, that I could not endure the thought of her stooping to that hound.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
19  Once for all; I knew to my sorrow, often and often, if not always, that I loved her against reason, against promise, against peace, against hope, against happiness, against all discouragement that could be.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
20  When I had taken leave of the pretty, gentle, dark-eyed girl, and of the motherly woman who had not outlived her honest sympathy with a little affair of true love, I felt as if the Old Green Copper Ropewalk had grown quite a different place.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVI