MADNESS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from King Lear by William Shakespeare
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 Current Search - madness in King Lear
1  He's mad that trusts in the tameness of a wolf, a horse's health, a boy's love, or a whore's oath.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
2  Let it fall rather, though the fork invade The region of my heart: be Kent unmannerly When Lear is mad.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
3  No, he's a yeoman that has a gentleman to his son; for he's a mad yeoman that sees his son a gentleman before him.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
4  Let's follow the old Earl, and get the bedlam To lead him where he would: his roguish madness Allows itself to anything.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
5  To take the widow Exasperates, makes mad her sister Goneril; And hardly shall I carry out my side, Her husband being alive.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT V
6  False of heart, light of ear, bloody of hand; hog in sloth, fox in stealth, wolf in greediness, dog in madness, lion in prey.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
7  I prythee, daughter, do not make me mad: I will not trouble thee, my child; farewell: We'll no more meet, no more see one another.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
8  Alack, 'tis he: why, he was met even now As mad as the vex'd sea; singing aloud; Crown'd with rank fumiter and furrow weeds, With harlocks, hemlock, nettles, cuckoo-flowers, Darnel, and all the idle weeds that grow In our sustaining corn.'
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV