MADNESS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - madness in Moby Dick
1  Human madness is oftentimes a cunning and most feline thing.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
2  In a strait-jacket, he swung to the mad rockings of the gales.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
3  High aloft in the cross-trees was that mad Gay-Header, Tashtego.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 47. The Mat-Maker.
4  There is a wisdom that is woe; but there is a woe that is madness.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 96. The Try-Works.
5  Now, in his heart, Ahab had some glimpse of this, namely: all my means are sane, my motive and my object mad.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
6  Panting and snorting like a mad battle steed that has lost its rider, the masterless ocean overruns the globe.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 58. Brit.
7  Wrapped, for that interval, in darkness myself, I but the better saw the redness, the madness, the ghastliness of others.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 96. The Try-Works.
8  The poor fellow whom Queequeg had handled so roughly, was swept overboard; all hands were in a panic; and to attempt snatching at the boom to stay it, seemed madness.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. Wheelbarrow.
9  But the scheme met with no opposition on the part of the other two; they swore they were ready for that, or for any other mad thing, for anything in short but a surrender.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 54. The Town-Ho's Story.
10  Few or no words were spoken; and the silent ship, as if manned by painted sailors in wax, day after day tore on through all the swift madness and gladness of the demoniac waves.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
11  But, as in his narrow-flowing monomania, not one jot of Ahab's broad madness had been left behind; so in that broad madness, not one jot of his great natural intellect had perished.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
12  Best, therefore, withhold any amazement at the strangely gallied whales before us, for there is no folly of the beasts of the earth which is not infinitely outdone by the madness of men.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 87. The Grand Armada.
13  So that tormented to madness, he was now churning through the water, violently flailing with his flexible tail, and tossing the keen spade about him, wounding and murdering his own comrades.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 87. The Grand Armada.
14  Our sail was now set, and, with the still rising wind, we rushed along; the boat going with such madness through the water, that the lee oars could scarcely be worked rapidly enough to escape being torn from the row-locks.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
15  But be all this as it may, certain it is, that with the mad secret of his unabated rage bolted up and keyed in him, Ahab had purposely sailed upon the present voyage with the one only and all-engrossing object of hunting the White Whale.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
16  Yet, when by this collision forced to turn towards home, and for long months of days and weeks, Ahab and anguish lay stretched together in one hammock, rounding in mid winter that dreary, howling Patagonian Cape; then it was, that his torn body and gashed soul bled into one another; and so interfusing, made him mad.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
17  If such a furious trope may stand, his special lunacy stormed his general sanity, and carried it, and turned all its concentred cannon upon its own mad mark; so that far from having lost his strength, Ahab, to that one end, did now possess a thousand fold more potency than ever he had sanely brought to bear upon any one reasonable object.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
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