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Quotes from Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift
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 Current Search - man in Gulliver's Travels
1  We hauled off upon the laniard of the whip-staff, and helped the man at the helm.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER I.
2  However, the king treated him with tenderness, as a well-meaning man, but of a low contemptible understanding.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 3: CHAPTER IV.
3  The first man I saw was of a meagre aspect, with sooty hands and face, his hair and beard long, ragged, and singed in several places.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 3: CHAPTER V.
4  This made me reflect, how vain an attempt it is for a man to endeavour to do himself honour among those who are out of all degree of equality or comparison with him.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER V.
5  I had not been at home above ten days, when Captain William Robinson, a Cornish man, commander of the Hopewell, a stout ship of three hundred tons, came to my house.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 3: CHAPTER I.
6  The vessel was an English merchantman, returning from Japan by the North and South seas; the captain, Mr. John Biddel, of Deptford, a very civil man, and an excellent sailor.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 1: CHAPTER VIII.
7  And as it was tyranny in any government to require the first, so it was weakness not to enforce the second: for a man may be allowed to keep poisons in his closet, but not to vend them about for cordials.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER VI.
8  But I could not see how this could be done in their country, where the smallest wherry was equal to a first-rate man of war among us; and such a boat as I could manage would never live in any of their rivers.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER V.
9  In relating these and the following laws, I would only be understood to mean the original institutions, and not the most scandalous corruptions, into which these people are fallen by the degenerate nature of man.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 1: CHAPTER VI.
10  This man, who was old and dim-sighted, put on his spectacles to behold me better; at which I could not forbear laughing very heartily, for his eyes appeared like the full moon shining into a chamber at two windows.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER II.
11  But he, being a man well experienced in the navigation of those seas, bid us all prepare against a storm, which accordingly happened the day following: for the southern wind, called the southern monsoon, began to set in.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER I.
12  He said so many other obliging things, and I knew him to be so honest a man, that I could not reject this proposal; the thirst I had of seeing the world, notwithstanding my past misfortunes, continuing as violent as ever.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 3: CHAPTER I.
13  This man was a most ingenious artist, and according to my direction, in three weeks finished for me a wooden chamber of sixteen feet square, and twelve high, with sash-windows, a door, and two closets, like a London bed-chamber.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER III.
14  The seamen threw me the end of the cord, which I fastened to a hole in the fore-part of the boat, and the other end to a man of war; but I found all my labour to little purpose; for, being out of my depth, I was not able to work.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 1: CHAPTER VIII.
15  But the captain, Mr. Thomas Wilcocks, an honest worthy Shropshire man, observing I was ready to faint, took me into his cabin, gave me a cordial to comfort me, and made me turn in upon his own bed, advising me to take a little rest, of which I had great need.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER VIII.
16  The poor man squalled terribly, and the colonel and his officers were in much pain, especially when they saw me take out my penknife: but I soon put them out of fear; for, looking mildly, and immediately cutting the strings he was bound with, I set him gently on the ground, and away he ran.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 1: CHAPTER II.
17  Ingratitude is among them a capital crime, as we read it to have been in some other countries: for they reason thus; that whoever makes ill returns to his benefactor, must needs be a common enemy to the rest of mankind, from whom he has received no obligation, and therefore such a man is not fit to live.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 1: CHAPTER VI.
18  In like manner, the disbelief of a Divine Providence renders a man incapable of holding any public station; for, since kings avow themselves to be the deputies of Providence, the Lilliputians think nothing can be more absurd than for a prince to employ such men as disown the authority under which he acts.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 1: CHAPTER VI.
19  In these colleges the professors contrive new rules and methods of agriculture and building, and new instruments, and tools for all trades and manufactures; whereby, as they undertake, one man shall do the work of ten; a palace may be built in a week, of materials so durable as to last for ever without repairing.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 3: CHAPTER IV.
20  He spoke some words, whereupon immediately a young man with a flap came up to my side, and flapped me gently on the right ear; but I made signs, as well as I could, that I had no occasion for such an instrument; which, as I afterwards found, gave his majesty, and the whole court, a very mean opinion of my understanding.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 3: CHAPTER II.
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