MATTER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - matter in Hard Times
1  What did it matter, she said still.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
2  It matters very little how he gained it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
3  What did it matter, she had said to her father, when he proposed her husband.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
4  It matters little now, except as it may dispose you to think more leniently of his errors.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
5  It matters little what figures of wonderful no-meaning she began to trace upon her wrappers.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
6  The consultation ended in the men returning to the windlass, and the pitman going down again, carrying the wine and some other small matters with him.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
7  Although they had been so quiet since the first outbreak of the matter, that most people really did suppose it to have been abandoned as hopeless, nothing new occurred.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
8  It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it; but as matters stood, it was a town of unnatural red and black like the painted face of a savage.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
9  Many ears and eyes were busy with a vision of the matter of these placards, among turning spindles, rattling looms, and whirling wheels, for hours afterwards; and when the Hands cleared out again into the streets, there were still as many readers as before.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
10  The spectacle of a matron of classical deportment, seizing an ancient woman by the throat, and hauling her into a dwelling-house, would have been under any circumstances, sufficient temptation to all true English stragglers so blest as to witness it, to force a way into that dwelling-house and see the matter out.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V