ME in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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1  Lord save me, thinks I, that must be the harpooneer, the infernal head-peddler.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
2  True, they rather order me about some, and make me jump from spar to spar, like a grasshopper in a May meadow.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
3  I now by instinct followed the streets that took me waterward, for there, doubtless, were the cheapest, if not the cheeriest inns.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
4  Come along here, I'll give ye a glim in a jiffy; and so saying he lighted a candle and held it towards me, offering to lead the way.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
5  I come to your house and want a bed; you tell me you can only give me half a one; that the other half belongs to a certain harpooneer.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
6  If they but knew it, almost all men in their degree, some time or other, cherish very nearly the same feelings towards the ocean with me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
7  With other men, perhaps, such things would not have been inducements; but as for me, I am tormented with an everlasting itch for things remote.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
8  I now demand of you to speak out and tell me who and what this harpooneer is, and whether I shall be in all respects safe to spend the night with him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
9  Again, I always go to sea as a sailor, because they make a point of paying me for my trouble, whereas they never pay passengers a single penny that I ever heard of.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
10  So gathering up the shavings with another grin, and throwing them into the great stove in the middle of the room, he went about his business, and left me in a brown study.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
11  For my mind was made up to sail in no other than a Nantucket craft, because there was a fine, boisterous something about everything connected with that famous old island, which amazingly pleased me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
12  Now having a night, a day, and still another night following before me in New Bedford, ere I could embark for my destined port, it became a matter of concernment where I was to eat and sleep meanwhile.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
13  It was now about nine o'clock, and the room seeming almost supernaturally quiet after these orgies, I began to congratulate myself upon a little plan that had occurred to me just previous to the entrance of the seamen.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
14  Then the wild and distant seas where he rolled his island bulk; the undeliverable, nameless perils of the whale; these, with all the attending marvels of a thousand Patagonian sights and sounds, helped to sway me to my wish.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
15  Still, looking round me again, and seeing no possible chance of spending a sufferable night unless in some other person's bed, I began to think that after all I might be cherishing unwarrantable prejudices against this unknown harpooneer.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
16  By reason of these things, then, the whaling voyage was welcome; the great flood-gates of the wonder-world swung open, and in the wild conceits that swayed me to my purpose, two and two there floated into my inmost soul, endless processions of the whale, and, mid most of them all, one grand hooded phantom, like a snow hill in the air.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
17  But I soon found that there came such a draught of cold air over me from under the sill of the window, that this plan would never do at all, especially as another current from the rickety door met the one from the window, and both together formed a series of small whirlwinds in the immediate vicinity of the spot where I had thought to spend the night.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
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