MEANING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - meaning in Moby Dick
1  And taken with the context, this is full of meaning.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. The Sermon.
2  There lurks, perhaps, a hitherto unheeded meaning here.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. The Sermon.
3  We must have Hedgehog there, I mean Quohog, in one of our boats.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18. His Mark.
4  "Splice, thou mean'st SPLICE hands," cried Peleg, drawing nearer.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18. His Mark.
5  But his guttural responses satisfied me at once that he but ill comprehended my meaning.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
6  "You mean the ship Pequod, I suppose," said I, trying to gain a little more time for an uninterrupted look at him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19. The Prophet.
7  But then, what to make of his unearthly complexion, that part of it, I mean, lying round about, and completely independent of the squares of tattooing.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
8  We then turned over the book together, and I endeavored to explain to him the purpose of the printing, and the meaning of the few pictures that were in it.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
9  "Thou art as a lion of the waters, and as a dragon of the sea," saith Ezekiel; hereby, plainly meaning a whale; in truth, some versions of the Bible use that word itself.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 82. The Honour and Glory of Whaling.
10  And still deeper the meaning of that story of Narcissus, who because he could not grasp the tormenting, mild image he saw in the fountain, plunged into it and was drowned.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
11  I'll get the almanac and as I have heard devils can be raised with Daboll's arithmetic, I'll try my hand at raising a meaning out of these queer curvicues here with the Massachusetts calendar.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.
12  Now, when I say that I am in the habit of going to sea whenever I begin to grow hazy about the eyes, and begin to be over conscious of my lungs, I do not mean to have it inferred that I ever go to sea as a passenger.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
13  By this, he seemed to mean, not only that the most reliable and useful courage was that which arises from the fair estimation of the encountered peril, but that an utterly fearless man is a far more dangerous comrade than a coward.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. Knights and Squires.
14  I do deem it now a most meaning thing, that that old Greek, Prometheus, who made men, they say, should have been a blacksmith, and animated them with fire; for what's made in fire must properly belong to fire; and so hell's probable.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 108. Ahab and the Carpenter.
15  But with his gaze fixed upon the dim and distant horizon, Ahab seemed not to mark this wild bird; nor, indeed, would any one else have marked it much, it being no uncommon circumstance; only now almost the least heedful eye seemed to see some sort of cunning meaning in almost every sight.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 130. The Hat.
16  He seemed to take to me quite as naturally and unbiddenly as I to him; and when our smoke was over, he pressed his forehead against mine, clasped me round the waist, and said that henceforth we were married; meaning, in his country's phrase, that we were bosom friends; he would gladly die for me, if need should be.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
17  Men may seem detestable as joint stock-companies and nations; knaves, fools, and murderers there may be; men may have mean and meagre faces; but man, in the ideal, is so noble and so sparkling, such a grand and glowing creature, that over any ignominious blemish in him all his fellows should run to throw their costliest robes.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26. Knights and Squires.
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