MEANING in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - meaning in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  I mean everything that I have said.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
2  It sounds vain, but you understand what I mean.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
3  Her grandfather hated Kelso, thought him a mean dog.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
4  I understand what you mean, and I believe in this girl.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
5  she spoke the words as though they conveyed no meaning to her.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
6  "I don't know what you mean, Basil," he exclaimed, turning round.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
7  This young dandy who was making love to her could mean her no good.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
8  You don't mean a single word of all that, Harry; you know you don't.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
9  He stood there motionless and in wonder, dimly conscious that Hallward was speaking to him, but not catching the meaning of his words.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
10  When your youth goes, your beauty will go with it, and then you will suddenly discover that there are no triumphs left for you, or have to content yourself with those mean triumphs that the memory of your past will make more bitter than defeats.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
11  I fancy that the true explanation is this: It often happens that the real tragedies of life occur in such an inartistic manner that they hurt us by their crude violence, their absolute incoherence, their absurd want of meaning, their entire lack of style.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8