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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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1  But she knew from her reading infinitely more of the ways of toiling insects than of these toiling men and women.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
2  With these two men she ran to another half-a-mile further, and with that one to another, while they ran elsewhere.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
3  He had been for many years, a quiet silent man, associating but little with other men, and used to companionship with his own thoughts.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
4  It was one of the most exasperating attributes of Bounderby, that he not only sang his own praises but stimulated other men to sing them.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
5  For, now, the rope came in, tightened and strained to its utmost as it appeared, and the men turned heavily, and the windlass complained.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
6  By general consent, they even avoided that side of the street on which he habitually walked; and left it, of all the working men, to him only.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
7  The consultation ended in the men returning to the windlass, and the pitman going down again, carrying the wine and some other small matters with him.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
8  These men and women were yet in the streets, passing quietly to their homes, when Sissy, who had been called away from Louisa some minutes before, returned.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
9  Every sound of insects in the air, every stirring of the leaves, every whisper among these men, made Sissy tremble, for she thought it was a cry at the bottom of the pit.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
10  The sun was four hours lower than when Sissy and Rachael had first sat down upon the grass, before a means of enabling two men to descend securely was rigged with poles and ropes.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
11  As the rope went out, tight and strained, and the windlass creaked, there was not a breath among the one or two hundred men and women looking on, that came as it was wont to come.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
12  The men called and listened as she had done, and examined the edge of the chasm, and settled how it had happened, and then sat down to wait until the implements they wanted should come up.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
13  Both Mr. Childers and Master Kidderminster walked in a curious manner; with their legs wider apart than the general run of men, and with a very knowing assumption of being stiff in the knees.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
14  The smoke-serpents were indifferent who was lost or found, who turned out bad or good; the melancholy mad elephants, like the Hard Fact men, abated nothing of their set routine, whatever happened.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V
15  There being now people enough present to impede the work, the sobered man put himself at the head of the rest, or was put there by the general consent, and made a large ring round the Old Hell Shaft, and appointed men to keep it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
16  Not a sound was audible in the building, but the slight rustle of men moving a little apart, all along the centre of the room, to open a means of passing out, to the man with whom they had all bound themselves to renounce companionship.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
17  There was a piece of ornamental water immediately below the parapet, on the other side, into which Mr. James Harthouse had a very strong inclination to pitch Mr. Thomas Gradgrind junior, as the injured men of Coketown threatened to pitch their property into the Atlantic.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
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