MORAL in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
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 Current Search - moral in Les Misérables
1  The revolutionary sense is a moral sense.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER III—SLANG WHICH WEEPS AND SLANG WHICH LAUGHS
2  There is a moral grandeur; we hold to that.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER VIII—FAITH, LAW
3  His moral backbone leaned on that firmness.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—A GROUP WHICH BARELY MISSED BECOMING HISTORIC
4  Physical suffering had completed the work of moral suffering.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER VI—SISTER SIMPLICE PUT TO THE PROOF
5  A heap of mud and stone, if you will, but, above all, a moral being.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI—TO SCOFF, TO REIGN
6  He seems hideous, and so he is, in the presence of the moral idea of the nineteenth.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I—WELL CUT
7  You have told me that you are the Bishop; but that affords me no information as to your moral personality.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X—THE BISHOP IN THE PRESENCE OF AN UNKNOWN LIGHT
8  A badly constituted grandeur in which are combined all the material elements and into which no moral element enters.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV—CRACKS BENEATH THE FOUNDATION
9  Certainly, these powerful reveries have their moral utility, and by these arduous paths one approaches to ideal perfection.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV—WHAT HE THOUGHT
10  After having sketched its moral face, it will not prove unprofitable to point out, in a few words, its material configuration.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER VIII—POST CORDA LAPIDES
11  Probably the principles and the elements, on which the regular gravitations of the moral, as of the material, world depend, had complained.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IX—THE UNEXPECTED
12  These are the terms of his deposition: 'I do not even stand in need of circumstantial proofs and moral presumptions to give the lie to the prisoner's denial.'
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER X—THE SYSTEM OF DENIALS
13  Elements and principles mingle, combine, wed, multiply with each other, to such a point that the material and the moral world are brought eventually to the same clearness.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III—FOLIIS AC FRONDIBUS
14  The moral world has no grander spectacle than this: a troubled and uneasy conscience, which has arrived on the brink of an evil action, contemplating the slumber of the just.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XI—WHAT HE DOES
15  The light of day seems extinguished without, the moral light within; in these shadows man encounters the feebleness of the woman and the child, and bends them violently to ignominy.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER V—A PROVIDENTIAL PEEP-HOLE
16  On the one hand, a moral pest, guarded from sight, penned up under the range of cannon, and literally devouring its plague-stricken victims; on the other, the chaste flame of all souls on the same hearth.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER IX—CLOISTERED
17  While reading himself this moral lesson, for there were occasions on which Marius, like all truly honest hearts, was his own pedagogue and scolded himself more than he deserved, he stared at the wall which separated him from the Jondrettes, as though he were able to make his gaze, full of pity, penetrate that partition and warm these wretched people.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER V—A PROVIDENTIAL PEEP-HOLE
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