MORALS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - morals in Hard Times
1  Well; all sorts of humbugs profess morality.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
2  There was a moral infection of clap-trap in him.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
3  Mrs. Sparsit uttered a gentle ejaculation, as having received a moral shock.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI
4  A creature so foul to look at, in her tatters, stains and splashes, but so much fouler than that in her moral infamy, that it was a shameful thing even to see her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
5  From the House of Commons to the House of Correction, there is a general profession of morality, except among our people; it really is that exception which makes our people quite reviving.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
6  Then Slackbridge, who had kept his oratorical arm extended during the going out, as if he were repressing with infinite solicitude and by a wonderful moral power the vehement passions of the multitude, applied himself to raising their spirits.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
7  The moral sort of fellows might suppose that Mr. James Harthouse derived some comfortable reflections afterwards, from this prompt retreat, as one of his few actions that made any amends for anything, and as a token to himself that he had escaped the climax of a very bad business.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I