MORALS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
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 Current Search - morals in House of Mirth
1  She's a perfect vulture, you know; and she hasn't the least moral sense.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 8
2  As was always the case with her, this moral repulsion found a physical outlet in a quickened distaste for her surroundings.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 9
3  To characters like Gerty's such a sacrifice constitutes a moral claim on the part of the person in whose behalf it has been made.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 5
4  The moral oppression had produced a physical craving for air, and he strode on, opening his lungs to the reverberating coldness of the night.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 14
5  Her personal fastidiousness had a moral equivalent, and when she made a tour of inspection in her own mind there were certain closed doors she did not open.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 7
6  This was a relief to Mrs. Peniston, who could give herself up to her own symptoms, and Lily was advised to go and lie down, her aunt's panacea for all physical and moral disorders.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 15
7  Grace Stepney's mind was like a kind of moral fly-paper, to which the buzzing items of gossip were drawn by a fatal attraction, and where they hung fast in the toils of an inexorable memory.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 11
8  If anything came out at all, it would be such a vast unpacking of accumulated moral rags as left him, after his visitor had gone, with the feeling that he must fling open the windows and have his room swept out.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 3
9  She had learned by experience that she had neither the aptitude nor the moral constancy to remake her life on new lines; to become a worker among workers, and let the world of luxury and pleasure sweep by her unregarded.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 11
10  She had taken the girl simply because no one else would have her, and because she had the kind of moral MAUVAISE HONTE which makes the public display of selfishness difficult, though it does not interfere with its private indulgence.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 3
11  But she could not breathe long on the heights; there had been nothing in her training to develop any continuity of moral strength: what she craved, and really felt herself entitled to, was a situation in which the noblest attitude should also be the easiest.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 8
12  She was realizing for the first time that a woman's dignity may cost more to keep up than her carriage; and that the maintenance of a moral attribute should be dependent on dollars and cents, made the world appear a more sordid place than she had conceived it.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 15
13  The sudden escape from a stifling hotel in a dusty deserted city to the space and luxury of a great country-house fanned by sea breezes, had produced a state of moral lassitude agreeable enough after the nervous tension and physical discomfort of the past weeks.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 5
14  If these two factors seem incompatible to the student of feminine psychology, it must be remembered that Gerty had always been a parasite in the moral order, living on the crumbs of other tables, and content to look through the window at the banquet spread for her friends.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 14