MORALS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - morals in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  It is not good for one's morals to see bad acting.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
2  My dear boy, you are really beginning to moralize.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
3  We are not sent into the world to air our moral prejudices.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
4  You never say a moral thing, and you never do a wrong thing.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
5  Modern morality consists in accepting the standard of one's age.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
6  There were opiates for remorse, drugs that could lull the moral sense to sleep.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
7  From a moral point of view, I cannot say that I think much of your great renunciation.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
8  The terror of society, which is the basis of morals, the terror of God, which is the secret of religion--these are the two things that govern us.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
9  As for the lives of one's neighbours, if one wishes to be a prig or a Puritan, one can flaunt one's moral views about them, but they are not one's concern.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 6
10  It feels instinctively that manners are of more importance than morals, and, in its opinion, the highest respectability is of much less value than the possession of a good chef.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
11  The middle classes air their moral prejudices over their gross dinner-tables, and whisper about what they call the profligacies of their betters in order to try and pretend that they are in smart society and on intimate terms with the people they slander.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12