MORNING in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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1  Ologies of all kinds from morning to night.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
2  But he told me to-night that he wished to do so in the morning.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
3  I dropped it that morning, that it might be supposed to have been used.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
4  Here, for example, I have been speaking to you this morning about tumblers.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
5  She made him her stately curtsey in the garden, one morning before breakfast.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
6  I had the pleasure of watching your house yesterday morning, and following you here.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII
7  Day was shining radiantly upon the town then, and the bells were going for the morning work.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
8  But, in the morning he appeared at breakfast at the usual hour, and took his usual place at the table.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
9  If no news comes to-morrow, let us walk in the country on Sunday morning, and strengthen you for another week.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V
10  No alarm takes place, till this chap, Bitzer, turns out this morning, and begins to open and prepare the offices for business.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
11  The Sunday was a bright Sunday in autumn, clear and cool, when early in the morning Sissy and Rachael met, to walk in the country.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
12  If you want a speech this morning, my friend and father-in-law, Tom Gradgrind, is a Member of Parliament, and you know where to get it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XVI
13  The Fairy palaces burst into illumination, before pale morning showed the monstrous serpents of smoke trailing themselves over Coketown.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI
14  I walked nine mile to the station this morning, and if I find nobody on the road to give me a lift, I shall walk the nine mile back to-night.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
15  The dawn coming, the morning coming, and the day coming, and neither message nor letter coming with either, he went down to the country house.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I
16  The factory-bells had need to ring their loudest that morning to disperse the groups of workers who stood in the tardy daybreak, collected round the placards, devouring them with eager eyes.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
17  To this Observatory, then: a stern room, with a deadly statistical clock in it, which measured every second with a beat like a rap upon a coffin-lid; Louisa repaired on the appointed morning.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XV
18  The next morning was too bright a morning for sleep, and James Harthouse rose early, and sat in the pleasant bay window of his dressing-room, smoking the rare tobacco that had had so wholesome an influence on his young friend.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
19  Her own private sitting-room was a story higher, at the window of which post of observation she was ready, every morning, to greet Mr. Bounderby, as he came across the road, with the sympathizing recognition appropriate to a Victim.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
20  Mr. Bounderby, under the influence of this difficult adjuration, backed up by her compassionate eye, could only scratch his head in a feeble and ridiculous manner, and afterwards assert himself at a distance, by being heard to bully the small fry of business all the morning.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X