MUSIC in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - music in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  You have set yourself to music.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
2  I like Wagner's music better than anybody's.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
3  We have had such a pleasant chat about music.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
4  But you must not think I don't like good music.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
5  I never talk during music--at least, during good music.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
6  And it has all been to you no more than the sound of music.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
7  The music jarred, and Dorian Gray started and stared at his friend.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19
8  The band, such as it was, struck up a few bars of music, and the dance began.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
9  They moved, as he spoke, like music, and seemed to have a language of their own.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
10  He becomes an echo of some one else's music, an actor of a part that has not been written for him.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
11  "Dorian," she answered, lingering over his name with long-drawn music in her voice, as though it were sweeter than honey to the red petals of her mouth.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
12  They had met at Lady Berkshire's the night that Rubinstein played there, and after that used to be always seen together at the opera and wherever good music was going on.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
13  The harsh intervals and shrill discords of barbaric music stirred him at times when Schubert's grace, and Chopin's beautiful sorrows, and the mighty harmonies of Beethoven himself, fell unheeded on his ear.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
14  To you at least she was always a dream, a phantom that flitted through Shakespeare's plays and left them lovelier for its presence, a reed through which Shakespeare's music sounded richer and more full of joy.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8
15  In fact, it was music that had first brought him and Dorian Gray together--music and that indefinable attraction that Dorian seemed to be able to exercise whenever he wished--and, indeed, exercised often without being conscious of it.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
16  He had changed, too--was strangely melancholy at times, appeared almost to dislike hearing music, and would never himself play, giving as his excuse, when he was called upon, that he was so absorbed in science that he had no time left in which to practise.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
17  He was conscious--and the thought brought a gleam of pleasure into his brown agate eyes--that it was through certain words of his, musical words said with musical utterance, that Dorian Gray's soul had turned to this white girl and bowed in worship before her.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
18  The praise of folly, as he went on, soared into a philosophy, and philosophy herself became young, and catching the mad music of pleasure, wearing, one might fancy, her wine-stained robe and wreath of ivy, danced like a Bacchante over the hills of life, and mocked the slow Silenus for being sober.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
19  The mere cadence of the sentences, the subtle monotony of their music, so full as it was of complex refrains and movements elaborately repeated, produced in the mind of the lad, as he passed from chapter to chapter, a form of reverie, a malady of dreaming, that made him unconscious of the falling day and creeping shadows.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
20  But a chance tone of colour in a room or a morning sky, a particular perfume that you had once loved and that brings subtle memories with it, a line from a forgotten poem that you had come across again, a cadence from a piece of music that you had ceased to play--I tell you, Dorian, that it is on things like these that our lives depend.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 19