MUSIC in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - music in Sense and Sensibility
1  In the evening, as Marianne was discovered to be musical, she was invited to play.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
2  He must enter into all my feelings; the same books, the same music must charm us both.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
3  In books too, as well as in music, she courted the misery which a contrast between the past and present was certain of giving.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
4  I mean never to be later in rising than six, and from that time till dinner I shall divide every moment between music and reading.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
5  They speedily discovered that their enjoyment of dancing and music was mutual, and that it arose from a general conformity of judgment in all that related to either.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
6  They read, they talked, they sang together; his musical talents were considerable; and he read with all the sensibility and spirit which Edward had unfortunately wanted.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
7  Lady Middleton frequently called him to order, wondered how any one's attention could be diverted from music for a moment, and asked Marianne to sing a particular song which Marianne had just finished.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
8  She went to it; but the music on which her eye first rested was an opera, procured for her by Willoughby, containing some of their favourite duets, and bearing on its outward leaf her own name in his hand-writing.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 46
9  As John Dashwood had no more pleasure in music than his eldest sister, his mind was equally at liberty to fix on any thing else; and a thought struck him during the evening, which he communicated to his wife, for her approbation, when they got home.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
10  As Elinor was neither musical, nor affecting to be so, she made no scruple of turning her eyes from the grand pianoforte, whenever it suited her, and unrestrained even by the presence of a harp, and violoncello, would fix them at pleasure on any other object in the room.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
11  The party, like other musical parties, comprehended a great many people who had real taste for the performance, and a great many more who had none at all; and the performers themselves were, as usual, in their own estimation, and that of their immediate friends, the first private performers in England.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36
12  The pianoforte at which Marianne, wrapped up in her own music and her own thoughts, had by this time forgotten that any body was in the room besides herself, was luckily so near them that Miss Dashwood now judged she might safely, under the shelter of its noise, introduce the interesting subject, without any risk of being heard at the card-table.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
13  She played over every favourite song that she had been used to play to Willoughby, every air in which their voices had been oftenest joined, and sat at the instrument gazing on every line of music that he had written out for her, till her heart was so heavy that no farther sadness could be gained; and this nourishment of grief was every day applied.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
14  His pleasure in music, though it amounted not to that ecstatic delight which alone could sympathize with her own, was estimable when contrasted against the horrible insensibility of the others; and she was reasonable enough to allow that a man of five and thirty might well have outlived all acuteness of feeling and every exquisite power of enjoyment.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
15  But when this passed away, when her spirits became collected, when she saw that to the perfect good-breeding of the gentleman, he united frankness and vivacity, and above all, when she heard him declare, that of music and dancing he was passionately fond, she gave him such a look of approbation as secured the largest share of his discourse to herself for the rest of his stay.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10