NATURE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - nature in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
1  They had concealed a natural chasm which led under the rock.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
2  It was a very still Sabbath, and the mournful sound seemed in keeping with the musing hush that lay upon nature.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
3  A natural fillip followed, the beetle went floundering into the aisle and lit on its back, and the hurt finger went into the boy's mouth.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
4  Every boy and girl had a theory about the nature of that book; but no two theories were alike, and there was no way of getting at the facts in the case.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XX
5  He found that it curtained a sort of steep natural stairway which was enclosed between narrow walls, and at once the ambition to be a discoverer seized him.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
6  He sat looking into her drawn face and saw it grow smooth and natural under the influence of pleasant dreams; and by-and-by a smile dawned and rested there.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
7  A log raft in the river invited him, and he seated himself on its outer edge and contemplated the dreary vastness of the stream, wishing, the while, that he could only be drowned, all at once and unconsciously, without undergoing the uncomfortable routine devised by nature.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
8  There was not even a zephyr stirring; the dead noonday heat had even stilled the songs of the birds; nature lay in a trance that was broken by no sound but the occasional far-off hammering of a wood-pecker, and this seemed to render the pervading silence and sense of loneliness the more profound.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
9  The minister related many a touching incident in the lives of the departed, too, which illustrated their sweet, generous natures, and the people could easily see, now, how noble and beautiful those episodes were, and remembered with grief that at the time they occurred they had seemed rank rascalities, well deserving of the cowhide.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII