NATURE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
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 Current Search - nature in Frankenstein
1  The different accidents of life are not so changeable as the feelings of human nature.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 5
2  They penetrate into the recesses of nature and show how she works in her hiding-places.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
3  Yet some feelings, unallied to the dross of human nature, beat even in these rugged bosoms.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Letter 2
4  Even broken in spirit as he is, no one can feel more deeply than he does the beauties of nature.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Letter 4
5  I have described myself as always having been imbued with a fervent longing to penetrate the secrets of nature.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
6  They ascend into the heavens; they have discovered how the blood circulates, and the nature of the air we breathe.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 3
7  His gentleness was never tinged by dogmatism, and his instructions were given with an air of frankness and good nature that banished every idea of pedantry.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
8  I had gazed upon the fortifications and impediments that seemed to keep human beings from entering the citadel of nature, and rashly and ignorantly I had repined.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
9  Curiosity, earnest research to learn the hidden laws of nature, gladness akin to rapture, as they were unfolded to me, are among the earliest sensations I can remember.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
10  I wished, as it were, to procrastinate all that related to my feelings of affection until the great object, which swallowed up every habit of my nature, should be completed.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
11  It was a most beautiful season; never did the fields bestow a more plentiful harvest or the vines yield a more luxuriant vintage, but my eyes were insensible to the charms of nature.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
12  She was the living spirit of love to soften and attract; I might have become sullen in my study, rought through the ardour of my nature, but that she was there to subdue me to a semblance of her own gentleness.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
13  One secret which I alone possessed was the hope to which I had dedicated myself; and the moon gazed on my midnight labours, while, with unrelaxed and breathless eagerness, I pursued nature to her hiding-places.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
14  Not that, like a magic scene, it all opened upon me at once: the information I had obtained was of a nature rather to direct my endeavours so soon as I should point them towards the object of my search than to exhibit that object already accomplished.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
15  Learn from me, if not by my precepts, at least by my example, how dangerous is the acquirement of knowledge and how much happier that man is who believes his native town to be the world, than he who aspires to become greater than his nature will allow.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
16  The dissecting room and the slaughter-house furnished many of my materials; and often did my human nature turn with loathing from my occupation, whilst, still urged on by an eagerness which perpetually increased, I brought my work near to a conclusion.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 4
17  It was the secrets of heaven and earth that I desired to learn; and whether it was the outward substance of things or the inner spirit of nature and the mysterious soul of man that occupied me, still my inquiries were directed to the metaphysical, or in its highest sense, the physical secrets of the world.
Frankenstein By Mary Shelley
Get Context   In Chapter 2
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