NATURE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - nature in Great Expectations
1  "It is in my nature," she returned.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
2  And then she added, with a stress upon the words, "It is in the nature formed within me."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
3  It was protected from the weather by an ingenious little tarpaulin contrivance in the nature of an umbrella.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
4  The nature of my relations with her, which placed me on terms of familiarity without placing me on terms of favor, conduced to my distraction.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
5  It had passed through my thoughts to cry out for help again; though few could know better than I, the solitary nature of the spot, and the hopelessness of aid.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
6  My lavish habits led his easy nature into expenses that he could not afford, corrupted the simplicity of his life, and disturbed his peace with anxieties and regrets.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
7  Not that Trabb's boy was of a malignant nature, but that he had too much spare vivacity, and that it was in his constitution to want variety and excitement at anybody's expense.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
8  Put the case that he took her in, and that he kept down the old, wild, violent nature whenever he saw an inkling of its breaking out, by asserting his power over her in the old way.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LI
9  Indeed, I was not only so changed in the course of nature, but so differently dressed and so differently circumstanced, that it was not at all likely he could have known me without accidental help.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
10  Mr. and Mrs. Pocket had a toady neighbor; a widow lady of that highly sympathetic nature that she agreed with everybody, blessed everybody, and shed smiles and tears on everybody, according to circumstances.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
11  Be that as it may, he had directed Mrs. Pocket to be brought up from her cradle as one who in the nature of things must marry a title, and who was to be guarded from the acquisition of plebeian domestic knowledge.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
12  Yes; but my dear Handel," Herbert went on, as if we had been talking, instead of silent, "its having been so strongly rooted in the breast of a boy whom nature and circumstances made so romantic, renders it very serious.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
13  At first with such discourse, and afterwards with conversation of a more general nature, did Mr. Wemmick and I beguile the time and the road, until he gave me to understand that we had arrived in the district of Walworth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
14  It was understood that nothing of a tender nature could possibly be confided to old Barley, by reason of his being totally unequal to the consideration of any subject more psychological than Gout, Rum, and Purser's stores.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVI
15  And when the day came, and an open carriage was got into the Lane, Joe wrapped me up, took me in his arms, carried me down to it, and put me in, as if I were still the small helpless creature to whom he had so abundantly given of the wealth of his great nature.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVII
16  Mr. Pumblechook wore corduroys, and so did his shopman; and somehow, there was a general air and flavor about the corduroys, so much in the nature of seeds, and a general air and flavor about the seeds, so much in the nature of corduroys, that I hardly knew which was which.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
17  I inferred from the methodical nature of Miss Skiffins's arrangements that she made tea there every Sunday night; and I rather suspected that a classic brooch she wore, representing the profile of an undesirable female with a very straight nose and a very new moon, was a piece of portable property that had been given her by Wemmick.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
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