NATURE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - nature in A Tale of Two Cities
1  Some intense associations of a most distressing nature were vividly recalled, I think.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIX. An Opinion
2  Good could never come of such evil, a happier end was not in nature to so unhappy a beginning.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XI. Dusk
3  But, her courage was of that emotional nature that it brought the irrepressible tears into her eyes.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIV. The Knitting Done
4  Such grace as was visible in it, made it the uglier, showing how warped and perverted all things good by nature were become.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V. The Wood-Sawyer
5  As to the nature of the case, our confidence in your skill assures us that you will ascertain it for yourself better than we can describe it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
6  I had no difficulty in deducing from your unreserved conversation, and the rumour openly going about among your admirers, the nature of your calling.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII. A Hand at Cards
7  It was told me by the Bank that the gentleman would explain to me the details of the business, and that I must prepare myself to find them of a surprising nature.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV. The Preparation
8  Both her hearers derived a horrible enjoyment from the deadly nature of her wrath--the listener could feel how white she was, without seeing her--and both highly commended it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XII. Darkness
9  He told me that he was travelling on business of a delicate and difficult nature, which might get people into trouble, and that he was therefore travelling under an assumed name.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
10  Dear Doctor Manette, always knowing this, always seeing her and you with this hallowed light about you, I have forborne, and forborne, as long as it was in the nature of man to do it.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X. Two Promises
11  On inanimate nature, as on the men and women who cultivated it, a prevalent tendency towards an appearance of vegetating unwillingly--a dejected disposition to give up, and wither away.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII. Monseigneur in the Country
12  I decided, that day, to write privately to the Minister, stating the nature of the two cases to which I had been summoned, and the place to which I had gone: in effect, stating all the circumstances.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER X. The Substance of the Shadow
13  Towards that small and ghostly hour, he rose up from his chair, took a key out of his pocket, opened a locked cupboard, and brought forth a sack, a crowbar of convenient size, a rope and chain, and other fishing tackle of that nature.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIV. The Honest Tradesman
14  From the streets beyond the high wall and the strong gate, there came the usual night hum of the city, with now and then an indescribable ring in it, weird and unearthly, as if some unwonted sounds of a terrible nature were going up to Heaven.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER II. The Grindstone
15  That Providence, however, had put it into the heart of a person who was beyond fear and beyond reproach, to ferret out the nature of the prisoner's schemes, and, struck with horror, to disclose them to his Majesty's Chief Secretary of State and most honourable Privy Council.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III. A Disappointment
16  So her manner of marketing was to plump a noun-substantive at the head of a shopkeeper without any introduction in the nature of an article, and, if it happened not to be the name of the thing she wanted, to look round for that thing, lay hold of it, and hold on by it until the bargain was concluded.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII. A Knock at the Door
17  Among the talkers, was Stryver, of the King's Bench Bar, far on his way to state promotion, and, therefore, loud on the theme: broaching to Monseigneur, his devices for blowing the people up and exterminating them from the face of the earth, and doing without them: and for accomplishing many similar objects akin in their nature to the abolition of eagles by sprinkling salt on the tails of the race.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIV. Drawn to the Loadstone Rock
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