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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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1  Not that a ditch was new to me, for I was born in a ditch.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
2  Louisa turned her head to him, and bent it with a deference that was new in her.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
3  Mr. James Harthouse began to think it would be a new sensation, if the face which changed so beautifully for the whelp, would change for him.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
4  Because when Tom Gradgrind, with his new lights, tells me that what I say is unreasonable, I am convinced at once it must be devilish sensible.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
5  She looked at him, as he struck the table and made the teacups ring, with a proud colour in her face that was a new change, Mr. Harthouse thought.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
6  Although they had been so quiet since the first outbreak of the matter, that most people really did suppose it to have been abandoned as hopeless, nothing new occurred.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
7  No word of a new marriage had ever passed between them; but Rachael had taken great pity on him years ago, and to her alone he had opened his closed heart all this time, on the subject of his p.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
8  They went out without further discourse; and Mr. Bounderby piloted the new acquaintance who so strongly contrasted with him, to the private red brick dwelling, with the black outside shutters, the green inside blinds, and the black street door up the two white steps.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
9  What with a cooling drink adapted to the weather, but not so weak as cool; and what with a rarer tobacco than was to be bought in those parts; Tom was soon in a highly free and easy state at his end of the sofa, and more than ever disposed to admire his new friend at the other end.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II