NIGHT in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - night in Hard Times
1  Thou hadst no sleep last night, I can well believe.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
2  I passed the day in a ditch, and the night in a pigsty.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
3  He sunk into a chair, and moved but once all that night.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
4  The man seemed to have brightened with the night, as he went on.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
5  He was angry only one night, and that was not to me, but Merrylegs.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IX
6  She bade him good night in a broken voice, and went out into the street.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
7  On no other night in the year could he so ill have spared her patient face.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
8  She stopped at the corner, and putting her hand in his, wished him good night.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
9  He was goosed last night, he was goosed the night before last, he was goosed to-day.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
10  She answered with the old, quick, searching look of the night when she was found at the Circus; then cast down her eyes.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV
11  Whether it was that the heat prevented Mrs. Sparsit from working, or whether it was that her hand was out, she did no work that night.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
12  Straightway she turned her eyes back to his corner, with the defiance of last night, and moving very cautiously and softly, stretched out her greedy hand.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
13  It was a wet night, and many groups of young women passed him, with their shawls drawn over their bare heads and held close under their chins to keep the rain out.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
14  And often and often of a night, he used to forget all his troubles in wondering whether the Sultan would let the lady go on with the story, or would have her head cut off before it was finished.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IX
15  At last, when he rose to return to his hotel, and was a little doubtful whether he knew the way by night, the whelp immediately proffered his services as guide, and turned out with him to escort him thither.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II
16  The deaf serving-woman was rumoured to be wealthy; and a saying had for years gone about among the lower orders of Coketown, that she would be murdered some night when the Bank was shut, for the sake of her money.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
17  He thought of the home he might at that moment have been seeking with pleasure and pride; of the different man he might have been that night; of the lightness then in his now heavy-laden breast; of the then restored honour, self-respect, and tranquillity all torn to pieces.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
18  For the rest, she knew that after office-hours, she reigned supreme over all the office furniture, and over a locked-up iron room with three locks, against the door of which strong chamber the light porter laid his head every night, on a truckle bed, that disappeared at cockcrow.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
19  The measured motion of their shadows on the walls, was the substitute Coketown had to show for the shadows of rustling woods; while, for the summer hum of insects, it could offer, all the year round, from the dawn of Monday to the night of Saturday, the whirr of shafts and wheels.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
20  If he had had any sense of what he had done that night, and had been less of a whelp and more of a brother, he might have turned short on the road, might have gone down to the ill-smelling river that was dyed black, might have gone to bed in it for good and all, and have curtained his head for ever with its filthy waters.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER II