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Quotes from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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 Current Search - no in Jane Eyre
1  I explained to her that I had no parents.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
2  There was no possibility of taking a walk that day.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
3  I closed the book, which I dared no longer peruse, and put it on the table, beside the untasted tart.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
4  I shall send Miss Temple notice that she is to expect a new girl, so that there will be no difficulty about receiving her.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
5  I could make no sense of the subject; my own thoughts swam always between me and the page I had usually found fascinating.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
6  You think I have no feelings, and that I can do without one bit of love or kindness; but I cannot live so: and you have no pity.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
7  I leaned against a gate, and looked into an empty field where no sheep were feeding, where the short grass was nipped and blanched.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
8  It tarried, however: days and weeks passed: I had regained my normal state of health, but no new allusion was made to the subject over which I brooded.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
9  I say scarcely voluntary, for it seemed as if my tongue pronounced words without my will consenting to their utterance: something spoke out of me over which I had no control.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
10  As yet I had spoken to no one, nor did anybody seem to take notice of me; I stood lonely enough: but to that feeling of isolation I was accustomed; it did not oppress me much.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
11  I heard the name of Mr. Brocklehurst pronounced by some lips; at which Miss Miller shook her head disapprovingly; but she made no great effort to check the general wrath; doubtless she shared in it.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
12  I felt physically weak and broken down: but my worse ailment was an unutterable wretchedness of mind: a wretchedness which kept drawing from me silent tears; no sooner had I wiped one salt drop from my cheek than another followed.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
13  My head still ached and bled with the blow and fall I had received: no one had reproved John for wantonly striking me; and because I had turned against him to avert farther irrational violence, I was loaded with general opprobrium.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
14  This state of things should have been to me a paradise of peace, accustomed as I was to a life of ceaseless reprimand and thankless fagging; but, in fact, my racked nerves were now in such a state that no calm could soothe, and no pleasure excite them agreeably.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
15  I was carried into an inn, where the guard wanted me to have some dinner; but, as I had no appetite, he left me in an immense room with a fireplace at each end, a chandelier pendent from the ceiling, and a little red gallery high up against the wall filled with musical instruments.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
16  I covered my head and arms with the skirt of my frock, and went out to walk in a part of the plantation which was quite sequestrated; but I found no pleasure in the silent trees, the falling fir-cones, the congealed relics of autumn, russet leaves, swept by past winds in heaps, and now stiffened together.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
17  I stood and warmed my numbed fingers over the blaze, then I looked round; there was no candle, but the uncertain light from the hearth showed, by intervals, papered walls, carpet, curtains, shining mahogany furniture: it was a parlour, not so spacious or splendid as the drawing-room at Gateshead, but comfortable enough.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
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