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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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1  Make the betht of uth; not the wurtht.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
2  He was a rich man: banker, merchant, manufacturer, and what not.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
3  Mr. Gradgrind did not seem favourably impressed by these cogent remarks.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
4  Childers replied pointedly, that he was not at all astonished to hear it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
5  Indeed, Thomas did not look at him, but gave himself up to be taken home like a machine.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
6  You are not to have, in any object of use or ornament, what would be a contradiction in fact.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
7  Coketown did not come out of its own furnaces, in all respects like gold that had stood the fire.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
8  You never meet with quadrupeds going up and down walls; you must not have quadrupeds represented upon walls.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
9  A man who proceeds upon the principle that two and two are four, and nothing over, and who is not to be talked into allowing for anything over.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
10  They expected every moment to hear Merrylegs give tongue, but the highly trained performing dog had not barked when the girl and the candle appeared together.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
11  He went to work in this preparatory lesson, not unlike Morgiana in the Forty Thieves: looking into all the vessels ranged before him, one after another, to see what they contained.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
12  By nonsense he meant fancy; and truly it is probable she was as free from any alloy of that nature, as any human being not arrived at the perfection of an absolute idiot, ever was.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
13  His character was not unkind, all things considered; it might have been a very kind one indeed, if he had only made some round mistake in the arithmetic that balanced it, years ago.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
14  As it had grown too dusky without, to see the sign, and as it had not grown light enough within to see the picture, Mr. Gradgrind and Mr. Bounderby received no offence from these idealities.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
15  They all assumed to be mighty rakish and knowing, they were not very tidy in their private dresses, they were not at all orderly in their domestic arrangements, and the combined literature of the whole company would have produced but a poor letter on any subject.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
16  These attributes of Coketown were in the main inseparable from the work by which it was sustained; against them were to be set off, comforts of life which found their way all over the world, and elegancies of life which made, we will not ask how much of the fine lady, who could scarcely bear to hear the place mentioned.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
17  I, who came here to inform the father of the poor girl, Jupe, that she could not be received at the school any more, in consequence of there being practical objections, into which I need not enter, to the reception there of the children of persons so employed, am prepared in these altered circumstances to make a proposal.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
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