NOTION in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - notion in Sense and Sensibility
1  I have no notion of people's making such a to-do about money and greatness.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
2  May be she is ill in town; nothing in the world more likely, for I have a notion she is always rather sickly.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
3  I have a notion," said Sir John, "that Miss Marianne would not object to such a scheme, if her elder sister would come into it.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
4  I have no notion of men's going on in this way; and if ever I meet him again, I will give him such a dressing as he has not had this many a day.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30
5  She could hardly determine what her own expectation of its event really was; though she earnestly tried to drive away the notion of its being possible to end otherwise at last, than in the marriage of Edward and Lucy.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 37
6  But she could hear of no situation that at once answered her notions of comfort and ease, and suited the prudence of her eldest daughter, whose steadier judgment rejected several houses as too large for their income, which her mother would have approved.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
7  But Marianne abhorred all concealment where no real disgrace could attend unreserve; and to aim at the restraint of sentiments which were not in themselves illaudable, appeared to her not merely an unnecessary effort, but a disgraceful subjection of reason to common-place and mistaken notions.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11