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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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1  I hoped heartily we should have peace now.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
2  She lay still now, her face bathed in tears.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
3  And now, let us hear what you are unhappy about.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
4  And as to you, Catherine, I have a mind to speak a few words now, while we are at it.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
5  It was a fever; and it is gone: her pulse is as slow as mine now, and her cheek as cool.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
6  Her position before was sheltered from the light; now, I had a distinct view of her whole figure and countenance.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
7  I thought her conduct must be prompted by a species of dreary fun; and, now that we were alone, I endeavoured to interest her in my distress.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
8  He did not raise his to her often: a quick glance now and then sufficed; but it flashed back, each time more confidently, the undisguised delight he drank from hers.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
9  I declined joining their breakfast, and, at the first gleam of dawn, took an opportunity of escaping into the free air, now clear, and still, and cold as impalpable ice.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
10  And now that she is vanished to her rest, and I have meditated for another hour or two, I shall summon courage to go also, in spite of aching laziness of head and limbs.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
11  I urged my companion to hasten now and show his amiable humour, and he willingly obeyed; but ill luck would have it that, as he opened the door leading from the kitchen on one side, Hindley opened it on the other.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
12  The former offered me munificent wages; the latter ordered me to pack up: he wanted no women in the house, he said, now that there was no mistress; and as to Hareton, the curate should take him in hand, by-and-by.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
13  Your presence is a moral poison that would contaminate the most virtuous: for that cause, and to prevent worse consequences, I shall deny you hereafter admission into this house, and give notice now that I require your instant departure.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
14  Catherine had seasons of gloom and silence now and then: they were respected with sympathising silence by her husband, who ascribed them to an alteration in her constitution, produced by her perilous illness; as she was never subject to depression of spirits before.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
15  She held her hand interposed between the furnace-heat and her eyes, and seemed absorbed in her occupation; desisting from it only to chide the servant for covering her with sparks, or to push away a dog, now and then, that snoozled its nose overforwardly into her face.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
16  A minute previously she was violent; now, supported on one arm, and not noticing my refusal to obey her, she seemed to find childish diversion in pulling the feathers from the rents she had just made, and ranging them on the sheet according to their different species: her mind had strayed to other associations.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
17  I bid them be quiet, now that they saw me returned, and, benumbed to my very heart, I dragged up-stairs; whence, after putting on dry clothes, and pacing to and fro thirty or forty minutes, to restore the animal heat, I adjourned to my study, feeble as a kitten: almost too much so to enjoy the cheerful fire and smoking coffee which the servant had prepared for my refreshment.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
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