OBSERVE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - observe in Great Expectations
1  I therefore observed I was not quite sure of that.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XVII
2  "Then it must be a shilling," observed the coachman.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XX
3  I don't recommend him, observe; because I never recommend anybody.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XVIII
4  "Yes, Pip," observed Joe, whose voice sounded hollow in his beer-mug.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XVIII
5  Miss Skiffins mixed, and I observed that she and Wemmick drank out of one glass.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXXVII
6  As I keep the cash," Mr. Wemmick observed, "we shall most likely meet pretty often.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXI
7  You was a saying," he observed, when we had confronted one another in silence, "that surely I must understand.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXXIX
8  "Never mind what I make it, my friend," observed Mr. Jaggers, with a knowing and contradictory toss of his head.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIV
9  And I observed, with great surprise, that he devoted it to staring in my direction as if he were lost in amazement.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XLVII
10  This other gentleman," observed Joe, by way of introducing Mr. Wopsle, "is a gentleman that you would like to hear give it out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter X
11  At about this time, I began to observe that he was getting flushed in the face; as to myself, I felt all face, steeped in wine and smarting.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIX
12  It would all come out in good time, I observed, and in the meanwhile nothing was to be said, save that I had come into great expectations from a mysterious patron.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XVIII
13  As Wemmick and Miss Skiffins sat side by side, and as I sat in a shadowy corner, I observed a slow and gradual elongation of Mr. Wemmick's mouth, powerfully suggestive of his slowly and gradually stealing his arm round Miss Skiffins's waist.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXXVII
14  I had never heard Joe read aloud to any greater extent than this monosyllable, and I had observed at church last Sunday, when I accidentally held our Prayer-Book upside down, that it seemed to suit his convenience quite as well as if it had been all right.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter VII
15  I had scarcely had time to enjoy the coach and to think how like a straw-yard it was, and yet how like a rag-shop, and to wonder why the horses' nose-bags were kept inside, when I observed the coachman beginning to get down, as if we were going to stop presently.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XX
16  It was pleasant to observe that Mrs. Wemmick no longer unwound Wemmick's arm when it adapted itself to her figure, but sat in a high-backed chair against the wall, like a violoncello in its case, and submitted to be embraced as that melodious instrument might have done.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter LV
17  Standing by for a little, while they were at work, I observed that the odd looks they had cast at one another were repeated several times: with this difference now, that each of them seemed suspicious, not to say conscious, of having shown himself in a weak and unprofessional light to the other.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter LI
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