OBSERVED in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - observed in A Christmas Carol
1  "My time grows short," observed the Spirit.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
2  "You don't believe in me," observed the Ghost.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
3  "But you might know it," observed the gentleman.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
4  The clerk observed that it was only once a year.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
5  "I have no patience with him," observed Scrooge's niece.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
6  The Spirit paused a moment, as observing his condition, and giving him time to recover.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
7  "I don't mind going if a lunch is provided," observed the gentleman with the excrescence on his nose.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
8  But the relentless Ghost pinioned him in both his arms, and forced him to observe what happened next.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
9  "You must have been very slow about it, Jacob," Scrooge observed in a business-like manner, though with humility and deference.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
10  His body was transparent; so that Scrooge, observing him, and looking through his waistcoat, could see the two buttons on his coat behind.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
11  The room was very dark, too dark to be observed with any accuracy, though Scrooge glanced round it in obedience to a secret impulse, anxious to know what kind of room it was.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
12  Its feet, observable beneath the ample folds of the garment, were also bare; and on its head it wore no other covering than a holly wreath, set here and there with shining icicles.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
13  Scrooge had observed this change, but never spoke of it, until they left a children's Twelfth-Night party, when, looking at the Spirit as they stood together in an open place, he noticed that its hair was grey.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
14  But nothing doubting that, to whomsoever they applied, they had some latent moral for his own improvement, he resolved to treasure up every word he heard, and everything he saw; and especially to observe the shadow of himself when it appeared.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
15  Though he looked the phantom through and through, and saw it standing before him; though he felt the chilling influence of its death-cold eyes; and marked the very texture of the folded kerchief bound about its head and chin, which wrapper he had not observed before; he was still incredulous, and fought against his senses.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
16  In the struggle--if that can be called a struggle in which the Ghost, with no visible resistance on its own part, was undisturbed by any effort of its adversary--Scrooge observed that its light was burning high and bright; and dimly connecting that with its influence over him, he seized the extinguisher cap, and by a sudden action pressed it down upon its head.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
17  Gentlemen of the free-and-easy sort, who plume themselves on being acquainted with a move or two, and being usually equal to the time of day, express the wide range of their capacity for adventure by observing that they are good for anything from pitch-and-toss to manslaughter; between which opposite extremes, no doubt, there lies a tolerably wide and comprehensive range of subjects.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
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