OFFEND in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
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 Current Search - offend in The Count of Monte Cristo
1  I have already successfully conducted several public prosecutions, and brought the offenders to merited punishment.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 6. The Deputy Procureur du Roi.
2  Now, sir, pray do not be offended at the question I am about to put to you, as it comes in the way of my duty as your patron.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 56. Andrea Cavalcanti.
3  But, at the same time, the intonation was so soft that, however strange the speech might seem, it was impossible to be offended at it.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 40. The Breakfast.
4  Still I was but an agent, led on by an invisible and offended Deity, who chose not to withhold the fatal blow that I was destined to hurl.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 112. The Departure.
5  A cloud settled on his brow, evincing decided anxiety and uneasiness, instead of the expression of offended pride which had lately reigned there.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 78. We hear From Yanina.
6  Dearest Valentine," said the young man, "the difference between our respective stations makes me fear to offend you by speaking of my love, but yet I cannot find myself in your presence without longing to pour forth my soul, and tell you how fondly I adore you.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 51. Pyramus and Thisbe.
7  The beautiful Catalane and noble countess had lost both her proud glance and charming smile, because she saw nothing but misery around her; the walls were hung with one of the gray papers which economical landlords choose as not likely to show the dirt; the floor was uncarpeted; the furniture attracted the attention to the poor attempt at luxury; indeed, everything offended eyes accustomed to refinement and elegance.
The Count of Monte Cristo By Alexandre Dumas
Get Context   In Chapter 106. Dividing the Proceeds.