ONCE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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 Current Search - once in The Great Gatsby
1  You must have gone to church once.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 8
2  It's better that the shock should all come at once.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 7
3  Daisy was my second cousin once removed and I'd known Tom in college.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 1
4  I looked once more at them and they looked back at me, remotely, possessed by intense life.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 5
5  He came only once, in white knickerbockers, and had a fight with a bum named Etty in the garden.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 4
6  Now and then she moved and he changed his arm a little and once he kissed her dark shining hair.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 8
7  When I looked once more for Gatsby he had vanished, and I was alone again in the unquiet darkness.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 1
8  He hadn't once ceased looking at Daisy and I think he revalued everything in his house according to the measure of response it drew from her well-loved eyes.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 5
9  Each of us said over and over that it was a "crazy idea"--we all talked at once to a baffled clerk and thought, or pretended to think, that we were being very funny.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 7
10  At least once a fortnight a corps of caterers came down with several hundred feet of canvas and enough colored lights to make a Christmas tree of Gatsby's enormous garden.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 3
11  Then out into the spring fields, where a yellow trolley raced them for a minute with people in it who might once have seen the pale magic of her face along the casual street.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 8
12  His life had been confused and disordered since then, but if he could once return to a certain starting place and go over it all slowly, he could find out what that thing was.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 6
13  Daisy looked at Tom frowning and an indefinable expression, at once definitely unfamiliar and vaguely recognizable, as if I had only heard it described in words, passed over Gatsby's face.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 7
14  I'd been writing letters once a week and signing them: "Love, Nick," and all I could think of was how, when that certain girl played tennis, a faint mustache of perspiration appeared on her upper lip.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 3
15  Jewett, once head of the American Legion, and Miss Claudia Hip with a man reputed to be her chauffeur, and a prince of something whom we called Duke and whose name, if I ever knew it, I have forgotten.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 4
16  Sometimes she and Miss Baker talked at once, unobtrusively and with a bantering inconsequence that was never quite chatter, that was as cool as their white dresses and their impersonal eyes in the absence of all desire.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 1
17  Out of the corner of his eye Gatsby saw that the blocks of the sidewalk really formed a ladder and mounted to a secret place above the trees--he could climb to it, if he climbed alone, and once there he could suck on the pap of life, gulp down the incomparable milk of wonder.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
ContextHighlight   In Chapter 6
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