PACING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - pacing in Moby Dick
1  With slouched hat, Ahab lurchingly paced the planks.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30. The Pipe.
2  But Fleece had hardly got three paces off, when he was recalled.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 64. Stubb's Supper.
3  In this way the day wore on; Ahab, now aloft and motionless; anon, unrestingly pacing the planks.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 133. The Chase—First Day.
4  Soon his steady, ivory stride was heard, as to and fro he paced his old rounds, upon planks so familiar to his tread, that they were all over dented, like geological stones, with the peculiar mark of his walk.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. The Quarter-Deck.
5  As with glass under arm, Ahab to-and-fro paced the deck; in his forward turn beholding the monsters he chased, and in the after one the bloodthirsty pirates chasing him; some such fancy as the above seemed his.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 87. The Grand Armada.
6  But soon, as if satisfied that his work for that time was done, he pushed his pleated forehead through the ocean, and trailing after him the intertangled lines, continued his leeward way at a traveller's methodic pace.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 134. The Chase—Second Day.
7  With bent head and half-slouched hat he continued to pace, unmindful of the wondering whispering among the men; till Stubb cautiously whispered to Flask, that Ahab must have summoned them there for the purpose of witnessing a pedestrian feat.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. The Quarter-Deck.
8  Now, with elated step, they pace the planks in twos and threes, and humorously discourse of parlors, sofas, carpets, and fine cambrics; propose to mat the deck; think of having hanging to the top; object not to taking tea by moonlight on the piazza of the forecastle.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 98. Stowing Down and Clearing Up.
9  And, so full of his thought was Ahab, that at every uniform turn that he made, now at the main-mast and now at the binnacle, you could almost see that thought turn in him as he turned, and pace in him as he paced; so completely possessing him, indeed, that it all but seemed the inward mould of every outer movement.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. The Quarter-Deck.
10  And, so full of his thought was Ahab, that at every uniform turn that he made, now at the main-mast and now at the binnacle, you could almost see that thought turn in him as he turned, and pace in him as he paced; so completely possessing him, indeed, that it all but seemed the inward mould of every outer movement.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 36. The Quarter-Deck.
11  At the well known, methodic intervals, the whale's glittering spout was regularly announced from the manned mast-heads; and when he would be reported as just gone down, Ahab would take the time, and then pacing the deck, binnacle-watch in hand, so soon as the last second of the allotted hour expired, his voice was heard.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 133. The Chase—First Day.
12  Ere now it has been related how Ahab was wont to pace his quarter-deck, taking regular turns at either limit, the binnacle and mainmast; but in the multiplicity of other things requiring narration it has not been added how that sometimes in these walks, when most plunged in his mood, he was wont to pause in turn at each spot, and stand there strangely eyeing the particular object before him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.