PAIN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - pain in Moby Dick
1  But war is pain, and hate is woe.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 119. The Candles.
2  But all their pains seemed naught.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 119. The Candles.
3  Great pains, small gains for those who ask the world to solve them; it cannot solve itself.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 99. The Doubloon.
4  He leaves all his deliverance to God, contenting himself with this, that spite of all his pains and pangs, he will still look towards His holy temple.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. The Sermon.
5  In an instant's compass, great hearts sometimes condense to one deep pang, the sum total of those shallow pains kindly diffused through feebler men's whole lives.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 133. The Chase—First Day.
6  A peculiar walk in this old man, a certain slight but painful appearing yawing in his gait, had at an early period of the voyage excited the curiosity of the mariners.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 112. The Blacksmith.
7  As I walked away, I was full of thoughtfulness; what had been incidentally revealed to me of Captain Ahab, filled me with a certain wild vagueness of painfulness concerning him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
8  As most young candidates for the pains and penalties of whaling stop at this same New Bedford, thence to embark on their voyage, it may as well be related that I, for one, had no idea of so doing.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
9  I told him, too, that he being in other things such an extremely sensible and sagacious savage, it pained me, very badly pained me, to see him now so deplorably foolish about this ridiculous Ramadan of his.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. The Ramadan.
10  Not a word he spoke; nor did his officers say aught to him; though by all their minutest gestures and expressions, they plainly showed the uneasy, if not painful, consciousness of being under a troubled master-eye.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28. Ahab.
11  Aye, aye, I know that he was never very jolly; and I know that on the passage home, he was a little out of his mind for a spell; but it was the sharp shooting pains in his bleeding stump that brought that about, as any one might see.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
12  Often, in mild, pleasant weather, for twelve, fifteen, eighteen, and twenty hours on the stretch, they were engaged in the boats, steadily pulling, or sailing, or paddling after the whales, or for an interlude of sixty or seventy minutes calmly awaiting their uprising; though with but small success for their pains.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 114. The Gilder.
13  But all we said, not a word could we drag out of him; I almost felt like pushing him over, so as to change his position, for it was almost intolerable, it seemed so painfully and unnaturally constrained; especially, as in all probability he had been sitting so for upwards of eight or ten hours, going too without his regular meals.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. The Ramadan.
14  Queequeg believed strongly in anointing his boat, and one morning not long after the German ship Jungfrau disappeared, took more than customary pains in that occupation; crawling under its bottom, where it hung over the side, and rubbing in the unctuousness as though diligently seeking to insure a crop of hair from the craft's bald keel.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 84. Pitchpoling.