PALE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - pale in Great Expectations
1  "Come and fight," said the pale young gentleman.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
2  My mind grew very uneasy on the subject of the pale young gentleman.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
3  This pale young gentleman quickly disappeared, and reappeared beside me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
4  I felt that the pale young gentleman's blood was on my head, and that the Law would avenge it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
5  It was not alluded to in any way, and no pale young gentleman was to be discovered on the premises.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
6  Rather tall, of a lithe nimble figure, extremely pale, with large faded eyes, and a quantity of streaming hair.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
7  The pale young gentleman and I stood contemplating one another in Barnard's Inn, until we both burst out laughing.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
8  The pale young gentleman's nose had stained my trousers, and I tried to wash out that evidence of my guilt in the dead of night.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
9  Orlick, as if he had been of no more account than the pale young gentleman, was very soon among the coal-dust, and in no hurry to come out of it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
10  Perhaps I might have told Joe about the pale young gentleman, if I had not previously been betrayed into those enormous inventions to which I had confessed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
11  He was still a pale young gentleman, and had a certain conquered languor about him in the midst of his spirits and briskness, that did not seem indicative of natural strength.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
12  Under the circumstances, I felt that Joe could hardly fail to discern in the pale young gentleman, an appropriate passenger to be put into the black velvet coach; therefore, I said nothing of him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
13  The more I thought of the fight, and recalled the pale young gentleman on his back in various stages of puffy and incrimsoned countenance, the more certain it appeared that something would be done to me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
14  Never questioning for a moment that the house was now empty, I looked in at another window, and found myself, to my great surprise, exchanging a broad stare with a pale young gentleman with red eyelids and light hair.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
15  Without this arrest of everything, this standing still of all the pale decayed objects, not even the withered bridal dress on the collapsed form could have looked so like grave-clothes, or the long veil so like a shroud.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
16  I had cut my knuckles against the pale young gentleman's teeth, and I twisted my imagination into a thousand tangles, as I devised incredible ways of accounting for that damnatory circumstance when I should be haled before the Judges.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XII
17  So, Estella and I went out into the garden by the gate through which I had strayed to my encounter with the pale young gentleman, now Herbert; I, trembling in spirit and worshipping the very hem of her dress; she, quite composed and most decidedly not worshipping the hem of mine.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
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