PASSIONS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - passions in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  I have new passions, new thoughts, new ideas.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
2  It had brought melancholy across his passions.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
3  Their strong passions must either bruise or bend.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
4  The fresh morning air seemed to drive away all his sombre passions.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
5  He does not think his natural thoughts, or burn with his natural passions.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
6  One's own soul, and the passions of one's friends--those were the fascinating things in life.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
7  It was the passions about whose origin we deceived ourselves that tyrannized most strongly over us.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
8  There were passions in him that would find their terrible outlet, dreams that would make the shadow of their evil real.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
9  Sometimes this was the effect of art, and chiefly of the art of literature, which dealt immediately with the passions and the intellect.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
10  The mad passions of a hunted animal stirred within him, and he loathed the man who was seated at the table, more than in his whole life he had ever loathed anything.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13
11  We degenerate into hideous puppets, haunted by the memory of the passions of which we were too much afraid, and the exquisite temptations that we had not the courage to yield to.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
12  It was clear to him that the experimental method was the only method by which one could arrive at any scientific analysis of the passions; and certainly Dorian Gray was a subject made to his hand, and seemed to promise rich and fruitful results.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
13  There were times when it appeared to Dorian Gray that the whole of history was merely the record of his own life, not as he had lived it in act and circumstance, but as his imagination had created it for him, as it had been in his brain and in his passions.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
14  The worship of the senses has often, and with much justice, been decried, men feeling a natural instinct of terror about passions and sensations that seem stronger than themselves, and that they are conscious of sharing with the less highly organized forms of existence.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
15  There were sins whose fascination was more in the memory than in the doing of them, strange triumphs that gratified the pride more than the passions, and gave to the intellect a quickened sense of joy, greater than any joy they brought, or could ever bring, to the senses.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
16  Certainly with hideous iteration the bitten lips of Dorian Gray shaped and reshaped those subtle words that dealt with soul and sense, till he had found in them the full expression, as it were, of his mood, and justified, by intellectual approval, passions that without such justification would still have dominated his temper.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
17  He had uttered a mad wish that he himself might remain young, and the portrait grow old; that his own beauty might be untarnished, and the face on the canvas bear the burden of his passions and his sins; that the painted image might be seared with the lines of suffering and thought, and that he might keep all the delicate bloom and loveliness of his then just conscious boyhood.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
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