PEOPLE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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1  They are the finest people in the world, these fellows are.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
2  Never fear, good people of an anxious turn of mind, that Art will consign Nature to oblivion.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI
3  I entertain a weak idea that the English people are as hard-worked as any people upon whom the sun shines.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
4  It was but a hurried parting in a common street, yet it was a sacred remembrance to these two common people.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
5  What I shall say to people in general, of the incompatibility that led to my so laying down the law, will be this.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
6  The object of his miserable existence was to prevent its recognition by any one among the various people he encountered.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
7  We hope to have, before long, a board of fact, composed of commissioners of fact, who will force the people to be a people of fact, and of nothing but fact.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II
8  From the House of Commons to the House of Correction, there is a general profession of morality, except among our people; it really is that exception which makes our people quite reviving.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
9  I am pretty well known to be rather an uncommon man, I believe; and most people will understand fast enough that it must be a woman rather out of the common, also, who, in the long run, would come up to my mark.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
10  You had better tell us at once, that that fellow Slackbridge is not in the town, stirring up the people to mutiny; and that he is not a regular qualified leader of the people: that is, a most confounded scoundrel.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V
11  Puffing out their poisonous volumes, they would not be long in hiding it; but, for half an hour, some of the many windows were golden, which showed the Coketown people a sun eternally in eclipse, through a medium of smoked glass.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
12  Now, these persistent assuagements of his misery, and lightenings of his load, had by this time begun to have the effect of making Mr. Bounderby softer than usual towards Mrs. Sparsit, and harder than usual to most other people from his wife downward.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
13  Mr. Gradgrind greatly tormented his mind about what the people read in this library: a point whereon little rivers of tabular statements periodically flowed into the howling ocean of tabular statements, which no diver ever got to any depth in and came up sane.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VIII
14  Nor was it merely the stranger who noticed this, because there was a native organization in Coketown itself, whose members were to be heard of in the House of Commons every session, indignantly petitioning for acts of parliament that should make these people religious by main force.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
15  They stood in the daylight before a crowd so vast, that if all the people in the world could have been brought together into one space, they could not have looked, he thought, more numerous; and they all abhorred him, and there was not one pitying or friendly eye among the millions that were fastened on his face.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIII
16  Yet there was a remarkable gentleness and childishness about these people, a special inaptitude for any kind of sharp practice, and an untiring readiness to help and pity one another, deserving often of as much respect, and always of as much generous construction, as the every-day virtues of any class of people in the world.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
17  They were ruined, when they were required to send labouring children to school; they were ruined when inspectors were appointed to look into their works; they were ruined, when such inspectors considered it doubtful whether they were quite justified in chopping people up with their machinery; they were utterly undone, when it was hinted that perhaps they need not always make quite so much smoke.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
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