PITY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from King Lear by William Shakespeare
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 Current Search - pity in King Lear
1  I should e'en die with pity, To see another thus.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
2  Had you not been their father, these white flakes Did challenge pity of them.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
3  This judgement of the heavens that makes us tremble Touches us not with pity.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT V
4  Good nuncle, in; and ask thy daughters blessing: here's a night pities neither wise men nor fools.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
5  A most poor man, made tame to fortune's blows; Who, by the art of known and feeling sorrows, Am pregnant to good pity.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
6  O dear father, It is thy business that I go about; Therefore great France My mourning and important tears hath pitied.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
7  Edmund, I think, is gone In pity of his misery, to dispatch His nighted life; moreover to descry The strength o th'enemy.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
8  The barbarous Scythian, Or he that makes his generation messes To gorge his appetite, shall to my bosom Be as well neighbour'd, pitied, and reliev'd, As thou my sometime daughter.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
9  When I desired their leave that I might pity him, they took from me the use of mine own house; charged me on pain of perpetual displeasure, neither to speak of him, entreat for him, or any way sustain him.
King Lear By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III