PLAIN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - plain in Hard Times
1  These things she could plainly see.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII
2  To thpeak plain to you, my opinion ith that you had better cut it thort, and drop it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
3  But if you ask me whether I have loved him, or do love him, I tell you plainly, father, that it may be so.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
4  She was very cleanly and plainly dressed, had country mud upon her shoes, and was newly come from a journey.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII
5  The end to which it led was before him, pretty plainly; but he troubled himself with no calculations about it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
6  Now, to be plain with you, if I ever, in the whole course of my life, take seven looks at it, at a hundred pound a look, it will be as much as I shall do.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
7  An ill-made, high-shouldered man, with lowering brows, and his features crushed into an habitually sour expression, he contrasted most unfavourably, even in his mongrel dress, with the great body of his hearers in their plain working clothes.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
8  He had artfully, but plainly, assured her that he knew her heart in its last most delicate recesses; he had come so near to her through its tenderest sentiment; he had associated himself with that feeling; and the barrier behind which she lived, had melted away.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
9  But, I am not in a very agreeable state, I tell you plainly: not relishing this business, even as it is, and not considering that I am at any time as dutifully and submissively treated by your daughter, as Josiah Bounderby of Coketown ought to be treated by his wife.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
10  Louisa looked, in part incredulous, in part frightened, in part overcome with quick sympathy, when this man of so much self-command, who had been so plain and steady through the late interview, lost his composure in a moment, and now stood with his hand before his face.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
11  All the journey, immovable in the air though never left behind; plain to the dark eyes of her mind, as the electric wires which ruled a colossal strip of music-paper out of the evening sky, were plain to the dark eyes of her body; Mrs. Sparsit saw her staircase, with the figure coming down.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
12  The flutter of her manner, in the unwonted noise of the streets; the spare shawl, carried unfolded on her arm; the heavy umbrella, and little basket; the loose long-fingered gloves, to which her hands were unused; all bespoke an old woman from the country, in her plain holiday clothes, come into Coketown on an expedition of rare occurrence.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII