POSITIVE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - positive in Great Expectations
1  I hope I know my poor grandpapa's position.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIII
2  After another silent turn in the garden, I fell back on the main position.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
3  They were in what is called a good position, and visited, and were visited by, numbers of people.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
4  Among this good company I should have felt myself, even if I hadn't robbed the pantry, in a false position.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
5  In my heart I believed her to be right; and yet I took it rather ill, too, that she should be so positive on the point.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
6  When Barnwell began to go wrong, I declare that I felt positively apologetic, Pumblechook's indignant stare so taxed me with it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
7  Still my position was a distinguished one, and I was not at all dissatisfied with it, until Fate threw me in the way of that unlimited miscreant, Trabb's boy.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
8  Sarah Pocket came to the gate, and positively reeled back when she saw me so changed; her walnut-shell countenance likewise turned from brown to green and yellow.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
9  Finding that the afternoon coach was gone, and finding that his uneasiness grew into positive alarm, as obstacles came in his way, he resolved to follow in a post-chaise.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIII
10  In order, however, that our superior position might not be compromised thereby, a money-box was kept on the kitchen mantel-shelf, in to which it was publicly made known that all my earnings were dropped.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
11  Looking back at him, I thought of the first night of his return, when our positions were reversed, and when I little supposed my heart could ever be as heavy and anxious at parting from him as it was now.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVI
12  She was even more dreadfully fond of Estella than she had been when I last saw them together; I repeat the word advisedly, for there was something positively dreadful in the energy of her looks and embraces.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVIII
13  I tried to rest him on the arm I could use, in any easy position; but it was dreadful to think that I could not be sorry at heart for his being badly hurt, since it was unquestionably best that he should die.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
14  When he felt his case unusually serious, and that he positively must find an opening, he would go on 'Change at a busy time, and walk in and out, in a kind of gloomy country dance figure, among the assembled magnates.'
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
15  All the truth of my position came flashing on me; and its disappointments, dangers, disgraces, consequences of all kinds, rushed in in such a multitude that I was borne down by them and had to struggle for every breath I drew.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
16  Miss Sarah Pocket, whom I now saw to be a little dry, brown, corrugated old woman, with a small face that might have been made of walnut-shells, and a large mouth like a cat's without the whiskers, supported this position by saying, "No, indeed, my dear."
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
17  Now, you are distinctly to understand that you are most positively prohibited from making any inquiry on this head, or any allusion or reference, however distant, to any individual whomsoever as the individual, in all the communications you may have with me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
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