POVERTY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
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 Current Search - poverty in House of Mirth
1  Under the glitter of their opportunities she saw the poverty of their achievement.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 5
2  No; she was not made for mean and shabby surroundings, for the squalid compromises of poverty.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 3
3  It was no longer, however, from the vision of material poverty that she turned with the greatest shrinking.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 13
4  Affluence, unless stimulated by a keen imagination, forms but the vaguest notion of the practical strain of poverty.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 7
5  But it is one thing to live comfortably with the abstract conception of poverty, another to be brought in contact with its human embodiments.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 14
6  There was room for her, after all, in this crowded selfish world of pleasure whence, so short a time since, her poverty had seemed to exclude her.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 4
7  He had meant to keep free from permanent ties, not from any poverty of feeling, but because, in a different way, he was, as much as Lily, the victim of his environment.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 14
8  Her danger lay, as she knew, in her old incurable dread of discomfort and poverty; in the fear of that mounting tide of dinginess against which her mother had so passionately warned her.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 10
9  It was true, then, that she had taken money from Trenor; but true also, as the contents of the little desk declared, that the obligation had been intolerable to her, and that at the first opportunity she had freed herself from it, though the act left her face to face with bare unmitigated poverty.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 14