PROPER in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - proper in Pride and Prejudice
1  By you, I was properly humbled.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 58
2  The whole family, in short, were properly overjoyed on the occasion.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
3  You thought me then devoid of every proper feeling, I am sure you did.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 58
4  Young women should always be properly guarded and attended, according to their situation in life.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 37
5  That is all very proper and civil, I am sure," said Mrs. Bennet, "and I dare say she is a very agreeable woman.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
6  With proper civilities the ladies then withdrew; all of them equally surprised that he meditated a quick return.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
7  The invitation was accepted of course, and at a proper hour they joined the party in Lady Catherine's drawing-room.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 31
8  You judge very properly," said Mr. Bennet, "and it is happy for you that you possess the talent of flattering with delicacy.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14
9  The satisfaction of prevailing on one of the most worthless young men in Great Britain to be her husband might then have rested in its proper place.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
10  He did not judge your father to be a person whom he could so properly consult as your uncle, and therefore readily postponed seeing him till after the departure of the former.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
11  Choose properly, choose a gentlewoman for my sake; and for your own, let her be an active, useful sort of person, not brought up high, but able to make a small income go a good way.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
12  It was owing to him, to his reserve and want of proper consideration, that Wickham's character had been so misunderstood, and consequently that he had been received and noticed as he was.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 52
13  She was not of so ungovernable a temper as Lydia; and, removed from the influence of Lydia's example, she became, by proper attention and management, less irritable, less ignorant, and less insipid.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 61
14  If, as I conclude will be the case, you send me full powers to act in your name throughout the whole of this business, I will immediately give directions to Haggerston for preparing a proper settlement.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 49
15  She was busily searching through the neighbourhood for a proper situation for her daughter, and, without knowing or considering what their income might be, rejected many as deficient in size and importance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50
16  My dear Jane, Mr. Collins is a conceited, pompous, narrow-minded, silly man; you know he is, as well as I do; and you must feel, as well as I do, that the woman who married him cannot have a proper way of thinking.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 24
17  Her ladyship, with great condescension, arose to receive them; and as Mrs. Collins had settled it with her husband that the office of introduction should be hers, it was performed in a proper manner, without any of those apologies and thanks which he would have thought necessary.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
18  Miss de Bourgh was pale and sickly; her features, though not plain, were insignificant; and she spoke very little, except in a low voice, to Mrs. Jenkinson, in whose appearance there was nothing remarkable, and who was entirely engaged in listening to what she said, and placing a screen in the proper direction before her eyes.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 29
19  Elizabeth was now most heartily sorry that she had, from the distress of the moment, been led to make Mr. Darcy acquainted with their fears for her sister; for since her marriage would so shortly give the proper termination to the elopement, they might hope to conceal its unfavourable beginning from all those who were not immediately on the spot.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 50