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Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - pure in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  It is pure unadulterated country life.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15
2  His life with her would be beautiful and pure.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
3  Why, even in love it is purely a question for physiology.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
4  Look at the matter purely from the scientific point of view.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
5  The sky was pure opal now, and the roofs of the houses glistened like silver against it.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
6  But you, Dorian, with your pure, bright, innocent face, and your marvellous untroubled youth--I can't believe anything against you.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12
7  Before a week was over he was to come across a large nugget of pure gold, the largest nugget that had ever been discovered, and bring it down to the coast in a waggon guarded by six mounted policemen.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
8  Indeed, the probabilities are that the more insincere the man is, the more purely intellectual will the idea be, as in that case it will not be coloured by either his wants, his desires, or his prejudices.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
9  What there was in it of the purely sensuous instinct of boyhood had been transformed by the workings of the imagination, changed into something that seemed to the lad himself to be remote from sense, and was for that very reason all the more dangerous.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
10  There were moments, indeed, at night, when, lying sleepless in his own delicately scented chamber, or in the sordid room of the little ill-famed tavern near the docks which, under an assumed name and in disguise, it was his habit to frequent, he would think of the ruin he had brought upon his soul with a pity that was all the more poignant because it was purely selfish.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11