REASON in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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 Current Search - reason in Jane Eyre
1  Know that I doat on Corsairs; and for that reason, sing it con spirito.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
2  I need not say that I had my own reasons for dreading his coming: but come he did at last.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
3  It had slipped my memory that you have good reasons to be indisposed for joining in my chatter.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
4  All their class held these principles: I supposed, then, they had reasons for holding them such as I could not fathom.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
5  The reason of my departure I cannot and ought not to explain: it would be useless, dangerous, and would sound incredible.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
6  Ere long, I had reason to congratulate myself on the course of wholesome discipline to which I had thus forced my feelings to submit.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
7  This was true: and while he spoke my very conscience and reason turned traitors against me, and charged me with crime in resisting him.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
8  I did not like to walk at this hour alone with Mr. Rochester in the shadowy orchard; but I could not find a reason to allege for leaving him.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIII
9  I had my own reasons for being dismayed at this apparition; too well I remembered the perfidious hints given by Mrs. Reed about my disposition, &c.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
10  And yet it is said the Rochesters have been rather a violent than a quiet race in their time: perhaps, though, that is the reason they rest tranquilly in their graves now.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
11  It did not seem as if a prop were withdrawn, but rather as if a motive were gone: it was not the power to be tranquil which had failed me, but the reason for tranquillity was no more.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
12  One reason of the distance yet observed between us was, that he was comparatively seldom at home: a large proportion of his time appeared devoted to visiting the sick and poor among the scattered population of his parish.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
13  I saw he was going to marry her, for family, perhaps political reasons, because her rank and connections suited him; I felt he had not given her his love, and that her qualifications were ill adapted to win from him that treasure.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
14  I felt glad as the road shortened before me: so glad that I stopped once to ask myself what that joy meant: and to remind reason that it was not to my home I was going, or to a permanent resting-place, or to a place where fond friends looked out for me and waited my arrival.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
15  I was now able to concentrate my attention on the group by the fire, and I presently gathered that the new-comer was called Mr. Mason; then I learned that he was but just arrived in England, and that he came from some hot country: which was the reason, doubtless, his face was so sallow, and that he sat so near the hearth, and wore a surtout in the house.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
16  Mr. Brocklehurst, who, from his wealth and family connections, could not be overlooked, still retained the post of treasurer; but he was aided in the discharge of his duties by gentlemen of rather more enlarged and sympathising minds: his office of inspector, too, was shared by those who knew how to combine reason with strictness, comfort with economy, compassion with uprightness.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X