RELATIVE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 20 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
Buy the book from Amanzon
 Current Search - relative in Jane Eyre
1  The accession of fortune, the discovery of my relations, followed in due order.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
2  I have no relative but the universal mother, Nature: I will seek her breast and ask repose.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
3  He was never married, and had no near kindred but ourselves and one other person, not more closely related than we.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
4  Her relatives encouraged me; competitors piqued me; she allured me: a marriage was achieved almost before I knew where I was.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
5  I asked Aunt Reed once, and she said possibly I might have some poor, low relations called Eyre, but she knew nothing about them.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
6  I felt at times as if he were my relation rather than my master: yet he was imperious sometimes still; but I did not mind that; I saw it was his way.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
7  You must share it with her to-night, Jane: it is no wonder that the incident you have related should make you nervous, and I would rather you did not sleep alone: promise me to go to the nursery.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXV
8  I felt an inexpressible relief, a soothing conviction of protection and security, when I knew that there was a stranger in the room, an individual not belonging to Gateshead, and not related to Mrs. Reed.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
9  I softened considerably what related to the three days of wandering and starvation, because to have told him all would have been to inflict unnecessary pain: the little I did say lacerated his faithful heart deeper than I wished.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXVII
10  The teachers were fully occupied with packing up and making other necessary preparations for the departure of those girls who were fortunate enough to have friends and relations able and willing to remove them from the seat of contagion.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
11  It seems they had come in the carriage with their reverend relative, and had been conducting a rummaging scrutiny of the room upstairs, while he transacted business with the housekeeper, questioned the laundress, and lectured the superintendent.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
12  Pressed for further explanation, they declared she had told them of things they had said and done when they were mere children; described books and ornaments they had in their boudoirs at home: keepsakes that different relations had presented to them.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
13  The night before he left home, happening to see him walking in the garden about sunset, and remembering, as I looked at him, that this man, alienated as he now was, had once saved my life, and that we were near relations, I was moved to make a last attempt to regain his friendship.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
14  The two girls, on whom, kneeling down on the wet ground, and looking through the low, latticed window of Moor House kitchen, I had gazed with so bitter a mixture of interest and despair, were my near kinswomen; and the young and stately gentleman who had found me almost dying at his threshold was my blood relation.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
15  My father always cherished the idea that he would atone for his error by leaving his possessions to us; that letter informs us that he has bequeathed every penny to the other relation, with the exception of thirty guineas, to be divided between St. John, Diana, and Mary Rivers, for the purchase of three mourning rings.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX