RELIGION in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - religion in Moby Dick
1  After all, I do not think that my remarks about religion made much impression upon Queequeg.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. The Ramadan.
2  Stubb's exordium to his crew is given here at large, because he had rather a peculiar way of talking to them in general, and especially in inculcating the religion of rowing.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 48. The First Lowering.
3  Now, as I before hinted, I have no objection to any person's religion, be it what it may, so long as that person does not kill or insult any other person, because that other person don't believe it also.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. The Ramadan.
4  But when a man's religion becomes really frantic; when it is a positive torment to him; and, in fine, makes this earth of ours an uncomfortable inn to lodge in; then I think it high time to take that individual aside and argue the point with him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. The Ramadan.
5  How now in the contemplative evening of his days, the pious Bildad reconciled these things in the reminiscence, I do not know; but it did not seem to concern him much, and very probably he had long since come to the sage and sensible conclusion that a man's religion is one thing, and this practical world quite another.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
6  Because, in the first place, he somehow seemed dull of hearing on that important subject, unless considered from his own point of view; and, in the second place, he did not more than one third understand me, couch my ideas simply as I would; and, finally, he no doubt thought he knew a good deal more about the true religion than I did.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. The Ramadan.
7  I then went on, beginning with the rise and progress of the primitive religions, and coming down to the various religions of the present time, during which time I labored to show Queequeg that all these Lents, Ramadans, and prolonged ham-squattings in cold, cheerless rooms were stark nonsense; bad for the health; useless for the soul; opposed, in short, to the obvious laws of Hygiene and common sense.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. The Ramadan.