RESPECT in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - respect in Hard Times
1  In many great respects he was essentially below them.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IV
2  Mr. Bounderby knew it was somewhere down town, but knew no more respecting it.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
3  Coketown did not come out of its own furnaces, in all respects like gold that had stood the fire.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
4  Her father was changed in nothing so much as in the respect that he would have been glad to see her in tears.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I
5  But towards that lady, I do care what you do; and you shall do what is deferential and respectful, or you shall not come here.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
6  With all possible respect both for Mr. Gradgrind and for Mr. Bounderby, I think I perceive that he has not been fortunate in his training.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
7  He looked at her with some disappointment in his face, but with a respectful and patient conviction that she must be right in whatever she did.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X
8  There is some disparity in your respective years, but in your means and positions there is none; on the contrary, there is a great suitability.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XV
9  He held the respectable office of general spy and informer in the establishment, for which volunteer service he received a present at Christmas, over and above his weekly wage.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
10  He was neither courtly, nor handsome, nor picturesque, in any respect; and yet his manner of accepting it, and of expressing his thanks without more words, had a grace in it that Lord Chesterfield could not have taught his son in a century.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
11  Yet there was a remarkable gentleness and childishness about these people, a special inaptitude for any kind of sharp practice, and an untiring readiness to help and pity one another, deserving often of as much respect, and always of as much generous construction, as the every-day virtues of any class of people in the world.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
12  Time hustled him into a little noisy and rather dirty machinery, in a by-comer, and made him Member of Parliament for Coketown: one of the respected members for ounce weights and measures, one of the representatives of the multiplication table, one of the deaf honourable gentlemen, dumb honourable gentlemen, blind honourable gentlemen, lame honourable gentlemen, dead honourable gentlemen, to every other consideration.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XIV