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Quotes of RIVER from Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

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So we unhitched a skiff and pulled down the river two mile and a half, to the big scar on the hillside, and went ashore.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER II   Context
Well, about this time he was found in the river drownded, about twelve mile above town, so people said.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER III   Context
I noticed some pieces of limbs and such things floating down, and a sprinkling of bark; so I knowed the river had begun to rise.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER VII   Context
He abused me a little for being so slow; but I told him I fell in the river, and that was what made me so long.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER VII   Context
It was about dark now; so I dropped the canoe down the river under some willows that hung over the bank, and waited for the moon to rise.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER VII   Context
I made two mile and a half, and then struck out a quarter of a mile or more towards the middle of the river, because pretty soon I would be passing the ferry landing, and people might see me and hail me.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER VII   Context
I went up and set down on a log at the head of the island, and looked out on the big river and the black driftwood and away over to the town, three mile away, where there was three or four lights twinkling.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER VII   Context
So we talked it over all one night, drifting along down the river, trying to make up our minds whether to drop the watermelons, or the cantelopes, or the mushmelons, or what.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XII   Context
When the lightning glared out we could see a big straight river ahead, and high, rocky bluffs on both sides.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XII   Context
WE judged that three nights more would fetch us to Cairo, at the bottom of Illinois, where the Ohio River comes in, and that was what we was after.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XV   Context
It was a monstrous big river here, with the tallest and the thickest kind of timber on both banks; just a solid wall, as well as I could see by the stars.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XV   Context
But I said maybe we might think we was passing the foot of an island and coming into the same old river again.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XVI   Context
Of course there was a booming current; and of course that boat started her engines again ten seconds after she stopped them, for they never cared much for raftsmen; so now she was churning along up the river, out of sight in the thick weather, though I could hear her.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XVI   Context
Sometimes a stack of people would come there, horseback, from ten or fifteen mile around, and stay five or six days, and have such junketings round about and on the river, and dances and picnics in the woods daytimes, and balls at the house nights.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XVIII   Context
I went off down to the river, studying over this thing, and pretty soon I noticed that my nigger was following along behind.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XVIII   Context
Next we slid into the river and had a swim, so as to freshen up and cool off; then we set down on the sandy bottom where the water was about knee deep, and watched the daylight come.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XIX   Context
And afterwards we would watch the lonesomeness of the river, and kind of lazy along, and by and by lazy off to sleep.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XIX   Context
The king told us to stand well out towards the middle of the river, and not show a light till we got a long ways below the town.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XX   Context
On the river front some of the houses was sticking out over the bank, and they was bowed and bent, and about ready to tumble in.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XXI   Context
Sometimes a belt of land a quarter of a mile deep will start in and cave along and cave along till it all caves into the river in one summer.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XXI   Context
We struck the raft at the same time, and in less than two seconds we was gliding down stream, all dark and still, and edging towards the middle of the river, nobody saying a word.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XXIII   Context
NEXT day, towards night, we laid up under a little willow towhead out in the middle, where there was a village on each side of the river, and the duke and the king begun to lay out a plan for working them towns.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XXIV   Context
They gripped us all, and marched us right along, straight for the graveyard, which was a mile and a half down the river, and the whole town at our heels, for we made noise enough, and it was only nine in the evening.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XXIX   Context
Well, we swarmed along down the river road, just carrying on like wildcats; and to make it more scary the sky was darking up, and the lightning beginning to wink and flitter, and the wind to shiver amongst the leaves.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XXIX   Context
So then I took the bearings of a woody island that was down the river a piece, and as soon as it was fairly dark I crept out with my raft and went for it, and hid it there, and then turned in.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XXXI   Context
Being Tom Sawyer was easy and comfortable, and it stayed easy and comfortable till by and by I hear a steamboat coughing along down the river.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XXXII   Context
Old Miss Watson died two months ago, and she was ashamed she ever was going to sell him down the river, and said so; and she set him free in her will.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XLII   Context
We struck the raft at the same time, and in less than two seconds we was gliding down stream, all dark and still, and edging towards the middle of the river, nobody saying a word.
Mark Twain
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, CHAPTER XXIII   Context
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