RIVER in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - river in Moby Dick
1  Hoisting sail, it glided down the Acushnet river.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. Wheelbarrow.
2  But that same image, we ourselves see in all rivers and oceans.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
3  It is out of the idolatrous dotings of the old Egyptians upon broiled ibis and roasted river horse, that you see the mummies of those creatures in their huge bake-houses the pyramids.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
4  A low advancing hum was soon heard; and then like to the tumultuous masses of block-ice when the great river Hudson breaks up in Spring, the entire host of whales came tumbling upon their inner centre, as if to pile themselves up in one common mountain.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 87. The Grand Armada.
5  But as these pig-fish are a noisy, contemptible set, mostly lurking in the mouths of rivers, and feeding on wet hay, and especially as they do not spout, I deny their credentials as whales; and have presented them with their passports to quit the Kingdom of Cetology.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. Cetology.
6  Yet so vast is the quantity of blood in him, and so distant and numerous its interior fountains, that he will keep thus bleeding and bleeding for a considerable period; even as in a drought a river will flow, whose source is in the well-springs of far-off and undiscernible hills.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 81. The Pequod Meets The Virgin.
7  Stubb was beginning to look disappointed, especially as the horrible nosegay increased, when suddenly from out the very heart of this plague, there stole a faint stream of perfume, which flowed through the tide of bad smells without being absorbed by it, as one river will flow into and then along with another, without at all blending with it for a time.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 91. The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud.