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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - rose in Wuthering Heights
1  I rose to follow, but he turned the lock again.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
2  In her eagerness she rose and supported herself on the arm of the chair.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
3  Mr. Heathcliff, perceiving us all confounded, rose, and expeditiously made the tea himself.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
4  Heathcliff rose, and went into the kitchen, and from thence to the yard, calling out for Hareton.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
5  And say what I could, I was incapable of making her comprehend it to be her own; so I rose and covered it with a shawl.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
6  Wuthering Heights rose above this silvery vapour; but our old house was invisible; it rather dips down on the other side.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
7  I trembled at the first effects of this intelligence: he half rose up, looked eagerly round the apartment, and then sank back in a swoon.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
8  In the morning he rose early; and, as it was a holiday, carried his ill-humour on to the moors; not re-appearing till the family were departed for church.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
9  I rose with an irrepressible expression of what I felt on my lips, which induced my companion, who had been staring towards the door, to turn and look at me.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
10  Mr. Heathcliff sat at a table, turning over some papers in his pocket-book; but he rose when I appeared, asked me how I did, quite friendly, and offered me a chair.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
11  Consequently, he rose, in suicidal low spirits, as fit for the church as for a dance; and instead, he sat down by the fire and swallowed gin or brandy by tumblerfuls.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
12  With great grumblings, the fellow rose, and preceded me in my ascent: we mounted to the garrets; he opened a door, now and then, to look into the apartments we passed.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
13  Thus interrupting herself, the housekeeper rose, and proceeded to lay aside her sewing; but I felt incapable of moving from the hearth, and I was very far from nodding.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
14  She put the door gently too, slipped off her snowy shoes, untied her hat, and was proceeding, unconscious of my espionage, to lay aside her mantle, when I suddenly rose and revealed myself.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
15  On one side of the road rose a high, rough bank, where hazels and stunted oaks, with their roots half exposed, held uncertain tenure: the soil was too loose for the latter; and strong winds had blown some nearly horizontal.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
16  Whether Catherine had spent her tears, or whether the grief were too weighty to let them flow, she sat there dry-eyed till the sun rose: she sat till noon, and would still have remained brooding over that deathbed, but I insisted on her coming away and taking some repose.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVIII
17  This time, I remembered I was lying in the oak closet, and I heard distinctly the gusty wind, and the driving of the snow; I heard, also, the fir bough repeat its teasing sound, and ascribed it to the right cause: but it annoyed me so much, that I resolved to silence it, if possible; and, I thought, I rose and endeavoured to unhasp the casement.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
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